José Pablo Moncayo’s Huapango

Notes by TŌN cellist Jordan Gunn

The Composer
One of the happiest pieces we’ve programmed at The Orchestra Now since I arrived in 2020 has got to be Huapango by the great composer José Pablo Moncayo. Moncayo was born, lived, and studied in Mexico in the first half of the 20th century. His music was heavily influenced by that heritage and his teacher, the well-known composer Carlos Chávez. Much of Moncayo’s legacy includes not only his compositions, but also his accomplishments as a conductor, having been appointed the role of director and conductor of the National Symphony Orchestra of Mexico at age 37. His most famous composition, Huapango, is a bright and fun piece with traditional Mexican rhythms and soaring melodies played especially in the brass.

The Music
This piece is unique in the classical repertoire, notably because of the desire to dance to it. Classical music can sometimes create the feeling that you must sit and be silent during concerts, but Huapango invokes the opposite feeling. This music is about joy and pride, a characteristic not present in most 20th century compositions. The reason we in The Orchestra Now are musicians is to help people feel something when they come to concerts. It is important to me to showcase not only the injustices and sadness around the world, but also the light and joy.

In Moncayo’s Words
In a letter to one of his students, Moncayo recalled: “Blas Galindo [a fellow composer and colleague] and I went to Alvarado, one of the places where folkloric music is preserved in its most pure form; we were collecting melodies, rhythms, and instrumentations for several days. The transcription of it was very difficult because the huapangueros never sang the same melody twice in the same way. When I came back, I showed the collected material to Candelario Huízar, who gave me a piece of advice that I will always be grateful for: ‘Introduce the material first in the same way you heard it and develop it later according to your own ideas.’ And I did it, and the result is almost satisfactory for me.”

Manuel de Falla’s The Three- Cornered Hat

Notes by TŌN percussionist Luis Herrera Albertazzi

The Composer
Manuel de Falla is one of the most distinguished Spanish composers of the 20th century. His music can be described as a combination of poetry and asceticism that represents the spirit of Spain at its purest. Falla started his musical career taking piano lessons from his mother, and then continued to study composition with Felipe Pedrell, who he used as an inspiration, as he loved the way Pedrell combined church music, folk music, and Spanish native opera, also known as zarzuela. Later in his musical life Falla moved to Paris, where he was influenced by the composing and orchestrating style of Debussy, Dukas, and Ravel. He then returned to Madrid where he wrote his composition El Corregidor y la Molinera (The Governor and the Miller’s Wife), which was later rescored for a ballet called El Sombrero de Tres Picos (The Three-Cornered Hat).

The Ballet
The original story is the perfect Spanish folk story: a corrupt governor, the humble and honest miller, and his beautiful wife, whom the governor tries to seduce using his power and status. Sergei Diaghilev, a Russian ballet impresario, requested Falla to expand his composition to a ballet after seeing one of its performances. Choreographed by Leonid Massine (who also danced the role of the miller), with sets and costumes designed by Pablo Picasso, and conducted by Ernest Ansermet, this ballet was set for success. It is about 40 minutes long, performed by a full orchestra, a mezzo-soprano, and, on occasion, dancers. Given its success, Falla derived two orchestral suites to be performed on different concert stages around the world. The first dance we hear is a fandango, performed by the miller’s wife. The neighbors’ dance, second in the ballet, is a seguidilla. The dance of the miller’s wife becomes a flamenco farruca, which is a very intense dance in 4/4 time, that leads to the final dance, a jota, which is a rhythm where the time signature’s feel fluctuates between 3/4 and 6/8.

Debussy’s La Mer (The Sea)

Notes by TŌN harpist Taylor Ann Fleshman

New Ideologies
The turn of the 20th century was a profound and transformative era in the development of Western European Classical music. In the age of “-isms,” composers were looking for new ways to advance the development of classical music away from the Romantic Era and into a new future. Composers like Igor Stravinsky sought inspiration from Classical and Baroque form with Neoclassicism, while composers like Arnold Schoenberg sought inspiration from our deep and suppressed subconscious to develop Expressionism. With some of these new ideologies being regional, one such school that developed in France was Impressionism. Impressionism strives to express an experience rather than to achieve a perfectly accurate representation. One such parallel in the visual art world was Claude Monet and his Water Lilies series, which through distorted shapes and colors gave the viewer an impressionistic landscape as opposed to a highly realistic creation.

The Music
While Monet was painting his iconic works, French composer Claude Debussy was composing his impressionist work La Mer. Translating to “The Sea,” the three-movement work seeks to capture the essence of contrasting seascapes. The first movement, “From Dawn to Midday on the Sea,” begins in a mysterious manner but increases in intensity, eliciting a feeling of radiant ambience near the end of the movement. The second movement, “Play of the Waves,” suggests the motion of rocking back and forth through the use of musical conversation between various instruments; and the third, “Dialogue of the Wind and the Sea,” evokes imagery of powerful forces interacting. While the titles are visually suggestive, there is no definitive program to the music. Rather, the music suggests three different musical scenes that are up to the listener to interpret. Debussy does not try to reach a goal, climax, or a particular key. His music merely exists.

Hear Your Own Story
In addition to his exceptional harp writing, I personally enjoy this work because Debussy presents sounds that allow me, the listener, to hear my own story. He gives me a canvas, and I get to visualize my own painting.

Messiaen’s Le tombeau resplendissant (The Resplendent Tomb)

Notes by TŌN timpanist Keith Hammer III

Youth’s Departure, or Maternal Mourning
Grief. Rage. Despair. Sadness. These are the driving emotions that plagued the mind of Olivier Messiaen when composing Le Tombeau Resplendissant. He composed this symphonic poem in 1923, three years after completing his work Offrandes oubliées. In his preface to the work, he described his emotional state regarding him departing his youthful days, saying “My youth is dead: I am its executioner.” One could say that in this work he is purely mourning the loss of his youth, but he had also witnessed the death of his mother from consumption only four years prior. It is quite possible that his grief over his mother’s passing in such a horrid manner still lived on in him when composing this work.

The Resplendent Tomb
This work is in a four part form, in a fast-slow-fast-slow progression. In both of the fast portions, we witness the lashings of his rage and fury at his youth leaving him. The use of flourishes in the winds and strings are emblematic of his anger surging through his psyche, with the timpani and grand caisse strikes at the end of the sections displaying the finality of youth’s exit. In the second and fourth sections, Messiaen dispenses with the lashings and replaces them with more melancholic melodies, showing a temporary appeasement of his anger in the first slow part, then in the second slow part a glimmer of hope that he has accepted the death of his youth.

Grappling with Grief
In the first slow section the oboe, clarinet, and flute introduce and pass along a new theme. Though lyrical and melancholic, it is wrought with dissonance. Combined with the undulating harmony and high-register tremolo in the strings, we see the efforts of Messiaen to finally begin to accept his fate, all while his anger and fear loom not too far away, ready to strike again. In the final section, the timbre changes as Messiaen uses only strings. He also uses harmonics in the strings to create a very airy atmosphere, one in which the raging emotions from the third section disappear and give way to the violas and cellos reciting a melody in unison. Still maintaining a dissonant characteristic compared to the one in the first slow section, this melody differs in atmosphere. The harmonics and stable, E-major harmony can be seen as Messiaen finally moving on through the mourning process, releasing his anger and fear, accepting that his youth was bound to depart at some point.

THE ORCHESTRA NOW GIVES FIRST CARNEGIE HALL CONCERT THIS SEASON THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2021

World Premiere of Scott Wheeler’s Birds of America
Written for Guest Violinist Gil Shaham

First Carnegie Hall Performances of Julia Perry’s Stabat Mater and
George Bristow’s Complete Arcadian Symphony

New York, New York, October 29, 2021The Orchestra Now (TŌN) will give its first Carnegie Hall concert of the season on Thursday, November 18 at 7 pm. The concert features the world premiere of award-winning composer Scott Wheeler’s Birds of America performed by renowned violinist Gil Shaham, as well as the first full Carnegie Hall performances of Julia Perry’s Stabat Mater with mezzo-soprano Briana Hunter, praised by Opera News as “a mesmerizing mezzo-soprano with a fiery theatrical presence and dynamic vocalism,” in addition to George Bristow’s Arcadian Symphony.

TŌN performs on October 31 at the Rose Theater at Jazz at Lincoln Center a program of works by José Pablo Moncayo, Falla, Messiaen, and Debussy conducted by Carlos Miguel Prieto. The next concerts in New York City offer Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 5, performed by Shai Wosner at The Metropolitan Museum of Art on December 5; and a free performance featuring pieces by Berlioz, Britten, Tan Dun, and Sibelius at Peter Norton Symphony Space on December 19.

CARNEGIE HALL SERIES, Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage

Gil Shaham & Julia Perry
Thu, Nov 18, 2021 at 7 PM
Leon Botstein, conductor
Gil Shaham, violin
Briana Hunter, mezzo-soprano
Julia Perry: Stabat Mater
Scott Wheeler: Birds of America (World Premiere)
George Frederick Bristow: Symphony No. 4, Arcadian
Renowned violinist and Bard Conservatory of Music faculty member Gil Shaham joins the Orchestra for the world premiere of Birds of America by multi-award-winning composer, conductor, pianist, and teacher Scott Wheeler. Currently Senior Distinguished Artist-in-Residence at Boston’s Emerson College, Wheeler’s works have been commissioned by the Metropolitan Opera and performed by such artists as Renée Fleming and Kent Nagano. Black American composer Julia Perry’s dramatic Stabat Mater, a setting of the 13th-century medieval poem “Stabat Mater Dolorosa,” describes the crucifixion of Christ from the viewpoint of the Virgin Mother featuring mezzo-soprano Briana Hunter and is dedicated to Perry’s mother. Also on the program is George Frederick Bristow’s rarely-heard Arcadian Symphony. A Brooklyn native and noted choral composer, Bristow frequently wrote music with American themes—his Symphony No. 4 was originally titled The Pioneer.

Tickets priced at $25–$60 are available online at carnegiehall.org, by calling CarnegieCharge at 212.247.7800, or at the Carnegie Hall box office at 57th & Seventh Avenue. Ticket holders will need to comply with the venue’s health and safety requirements, which can be found here.

The Orchestra Now
The Orchestra Now (TŌN) is a group of 65 vibrant young musicians from 13 different countries across the globe: Canada, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, Hungary, Indonesia, Israel, Korea, Mongolia, Peru, Taiwan, and the United States. All share a mission to make orchestral music relevant to 21st-century audiences by sharing their unique personal insights in a welcoming environment. Hand-picked from the world’s leading conservatories—including the Yale School of Music, Shanghai Conservatory of Music, Royal Academy of Music, and the Eastman School of Music—the members of TŌN are enlightening curious minds by giving on-stage introductions and demonstrations, writing concert notes from the musicians’ perspective, and having one-on-one discussions with patrons during intermissions.

Conductor, educator, and music historian Leon Botstein, whom The New York Times said “draws rich, expressive playing from the orchestra,” founded TŌN in 2015 as a graduate program at Bard College, where he is also president. TŌN offers both a three-year master’s degree in Curatorial, Critical, and Performance Studies and a two-year advanced certificate in Orchestra Studies. The Orchestra’s home base is the Frank Gehry-designed Fisher Center at Bard, where it performs multiple concerts each season and takes part in the annual Bard Music Festival. It also performs regularly at the finest venues in New York, including Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and others across NYC and beyond. HuffPost, who has called TŌN’s performances “dramatic and intense,” praises these concerts as “an opportunity to see talented musicians early in their careers.”

The Orchestra has performed with many distinguished guest conductors and soloists, including Leonard Slatkin, Neeme Järvi, Gil Shaham, Fabio Luisi, Vadim Repin, Hans Graf, Peter Serkin, Gerard Schwarz, Tan Dun, and JoAnn Falletta. Recordings featuring The Orchestra Now include two albums of piano concertos with Piers Lane on Hyperion Records, and a Sorel Classics concert recording of pianist Anna Shelest performing works by Anton Rubinstein with TŌN and conductor Neeme Järvi. Buried Alive with baritone Michael Nagy, released on Bridge Records in August 2020, includes the first recording in almost 60 years—and only the second recording ever—of Othmar Schoeck’s song-cycle Lebendig begraben. Recent releases include an album of piano concertos with Orion Weiss on Bridge Records, and the soundtrack to the motion picture Forte. Recordings of TŌN’s live concerts from the Fisher Center can be heard on Classical WMHT-FM and WWFM The Classical Network, and are featured regularly on Performance Today, broadcast nationwide.

For upcoming activities and more detailed information about the musicians, visit theorchestranow.org.

Leon Botstein
Leon Botstein brings a renowned career as both a conductor and educator to his role as music director of The Orchestra Now. He has been music director of the American Symphony Orchestra since 1992, artistic co-director of Bard SummerScape and the Bard Music Festival since their creation, and president of Bard College since 1975. He was the music director of the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra from 2003–11 and is now conductor laureate. In 2018, he assumed artistic directorship of Campus Grafenegg and Grafenegg Academy in Austria. Mr. Botstein is also a frequent guest conductor with orchestras around the globe, has made numerous recordings, and is a prolific author and music historian. He is editor of the prestigious The Musical Quarterly and has received many honors for his contributions to music. More info online at LeonBotstein.com.

Press Contacts
Pascal Nadon
Pascal Nadon Communications
Phone: 646.234.7088
Email: pascal@pascalnadon.com

Mark Primoff
Associate Vice President of Communications
Bard College
Phone: 845.758.7412
Email: primoff@bard.edu

# # #

THE ORCHESTRA NOW OPENS ITS NEW YORK CITY SEASON AT ROSE THEATER AT JAZZ AT LINCOLN CENTER ON SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31

Guest Conductor Carlos Miguel Prieto Leads the Orchestra and Mezzo-Soprano Solange Merdinian in Works by Debussy, Falla, Messiaen, and Moncayo

Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, October 13, 2021 — The Orchestra Now (TŌN)—the visionary orchestra and master’s degree program founded by Bard College president, conductor, educator, and music historian Leon Botstein—begins its 2021–22 season in New York City on Oct. 31 at Rose Theater at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Frederick P. Rose Hall. The concert features acclaimed guest conductor Carlos Miguel Prieto, Musical America’s 2019 Conductor of the Year and music director of both the Orchestra of the Americas and the Orquesta Sinfónica Nacional de México, the country’s most important orchestra. He leads TŌN and mezzo-soprano Solange Merdinian in Falla’s ballet score El Sombrero de Tres Picos, along with Debussy’s La Mer, Messiaen’s Le tombeau resplendissant, and Mexican composer José Pablo Moncayo’s Huapango.

TŌN launched its 2021–22 season with three programs at the Fisher Center at Bard in September and early October, which included the premiere of Brahmsiana by conductor/composer Leonard Slatkin, who made his debut with TŌN performing works by Cindy McTee and Mussorgsky; and music director Leon Bostein conducting Dawson’s Negro Folk Symphony, Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 7, Strauss’ Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks, and Bruckner’s Symphony No. 5.

The following concert in New York City is at Carnegie Hall on Nov. 18 and features violinist Gil Shaham performing the world premiere of Scott Wheeler’s Birds of America, mezzo-soprano Briana Hunter in Julia Perry’s Stabat Mater, and Bristow’s Symphony No. 4.

Prieto, Falla & Debussy
Sunday, October 31, 2021 at 3 PM
Rose Theater at Jazz at Lincoln Center
Carlos Miguel Prieto, conductor
Solange Merdinian, mezzo-soprano
MessiaenLe tombeau resplendissant (The Resplendent Tomb)
DebussyLa Mer (The Sea)
FallaEl Sombrero de Tres Picos (The Three-Cornered Hat)
José Pablo MoncayoHuapango

The diverse program features French, Mexican, and Spanish composers, including Messiaen’s Le tombeau resplendissant, which he described as a type of epitaph in four main sections and was written when he was only 24. The next work is Debussy’s milestone, impressionistic interpretation of La Mer (The Sea) with its three movements that he preferred to call “symphonic sketches.” Manuel de Falla’s music to the ballet El Sombrero de Tres Picos was commissioned by Sergei Diaghilev and premiered in 1919. The soloist in this work, Armenian-American mezzo-soprano Solange Merdinian, is a 2009 graduate of Bard Conservatory’s Graduate Vocal Arts Program, and co-founder and co-artistic director of the non-profit organization New Docta and the New Docta International Festival in Argentina. She won the 2019 Pro Musicis Competition, completed a four-year world tour of Einstein on the Beach with the Philip Glass Ensemble, and has performed at Madison Square Garden and Carnegie Hall. Closing the program is Mexican composer/conductor José Pablo Moncayo’s Huapango. Moncayo was commissioned by Carlos Chávez to write a piece based on the folkloric music of the Veracruz area. Closely associated with Mexican nationalism, the resulting piece remains one of his most popular works.

Tickets priced at $25–$50 are available online at jazz.org, by calling CenterCharge at 212.721.6500, or at the Jazz at Lincoln Center box office at Broadway & 60th, Ground Floor. Ticket holders need to comply with the venue’s health and safety requirements, which can be found here.

The Orchestra Now
The Orchestra Now (TŌN) is a group of 65 vibrant young musicians from 13 different countries across the globe: Canada, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, Hungary, Indonesia, Israel, Korea, Mongolia, Peru, Taiwan, and the United States. All share a mission to make orchestral music relevant to 21st-century audiences by sharing their unique personal insights in a welcoming environment. Hand-picked from the world’s leading conservatories—including the Yale School of Music, Shanghai Conservatory of Music, Royal Academy of Music, and the Eastman School of Music—the members of TŌN are enlightening curious minds by giving on-stage introductions and demonstrations, writing concert notes from the musicians’ perspective, and having one-on-one discussions with patrons during intermissions.

Conductor, educator, and music historian Leon Botstein, whom The New York Times said “draws rich, expressive playing from the orchestra,” founded TŌN in 2015 as a graduate program at Bard College, where he is also president. TŌN offers both a three-year master’s degree in Curatorial, Critical, and Performance Studies and a two-year advanced certificate in Orchestra Studies. The Orchestra’s home base is the Frank Gehry-designed Fisher Center at Bard, where it performs multiple concerts each season and takes part in the annual Bard Music Festival. It also performs regularly at the finest venues in New York, including Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and others across NYC and beyond. HuffPost, who has called TŌN’s performances “dramatic and intense,” praises these concerts as “an opportunity to see talented musicians early in their careers.”

The Orchestra has performed with many distinguished guest conductors and soloists, including Leonard Slatkin, Neeme Järvi, Gil Shaham, Fabio Luisi, Vadim Repin, Hans Graf, Peter Serkin, Gerard Schwarz, Tan Dun, and JoAnn Falletta. Recordings featuring The Orchestra Now include two albums of piano concertos with Piers Lane on Hyperion Records, and a Sorel Classics concert recording of pianist Anna Shelest performing works by Anton Rubinstein with TŌN and conductor Neeme Järvi. Buried Alive with baritone Michael Nagy, released on Bridge Records in August 2020, includes the first recording in almost 60 years—and only the second recording ever—of Othmar Schoeck’s song-cycle Lebendig begraben. Recent releases include an album of piano concertos with Orion Weiss on Bridge Records, and the soundtrack to the motion picture Forte. Recordings of TŌN’s live concerts from the Fisher Center can be heard on Classical WMHT-FM and WWFM The Classical Network, and are featured regularly on Performance Today, broadcast nationwide.

For upcoming activities and more detailed information about the musicians, visit theorchestranow.org.

Leon Botstein
Leon Botstein brings a renowned career as both a conductor and educator to his role as music director of The Orchestra Now. He has been music director of the American Symphony Orchestra since 1992, artistic co-director of Bard SummerScape and the Bard Music Festival since their creation, and president of Bard College since 1975. He was the music director of the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra from 2003–11 and is now conductor laureate. In 2018, he assumed artistic directorship of Campus Grafenegg and Grafenegg Academy in Austria. Mr. Botstein is also a frequent guest conductor with orchestras around the globe, has made numerous recordings, and is a prolific author and music historian. He is editor of the prestigious The Musical Quarterly and has received many honors for his contributions to music. More info online at LeonBotstein.com.

Press Contacts
Pascal Nadon
Pascal Nadon Communications
Phone: 646.234.7088
Email: pascal@pascalnadon.com

Mark Primoff
Associate Vice President of Communications
Bard College
Phone: 845.758.7412
Email: primoff@bard.edu

# # #

Bruckner’s Symphony No. 5

Notes by TŌN bassoonist Cheryl Fries

The Mysterious Bruckner
Anton Bruckner’s compositions and legacy have remained a constant fascination and mystery. Bruckner has garnered a rather bizarre reputational legacy, accumulating several different personas: death obsessed, anti-social, a drunk, and a country bumpkin. It seems nearly impossible to determine exactly who Bruckner the person was, but it is clear that his colossal symphonies continue to intrigue musicians.

Obsessive Tendencies
Bruckner deeply admired the music of Richard Wagner; it has been said Bruckner’s symphonies are the symphonies Wagner never wrote. While composers like Strauss and Mahler were leading the helm of German modernism, Bruckner strongly upheld and expounded upon the musical conservatism of Wagner. Despite his humble beginnings, Bruckner was an intellectual and as such was deeply insecure and self-critical of his works, which contributed to the constant revision of his symphonies. Bruckner had a lot of obsessive tendencies when composing. One characteristic feature of his nine symphonies is the length and size, which Johannes Brahms offhandedly described as “symphonic boa constrictors.” Bruckner also had a fascination with counting, which ensured that his symphonies were masterfully crafted down to every last note and rhythm.

The Music
The most characteristic feature of the 5th Symphony is the contrapuntal style, which is first highlighted in the opening chorale of the first movement. The overall structure of this movement is an elongated sonata form that slowly builds, beginning softly and ending triumphantly, introducing themes in blocks of contrasting music. The second movement serves as a theme and variations, with the opening theme being introduced by the solo oboe at the start of the movement. The last variation uses the opening theme, but weaves underneath a contrapuntal moving line in the strings alongside a chorale in the brass that echoes the beginning of the symphony. The third movement alternates between two contrasting styles. It begins with a faster, menacing theme in a minor key and then eventually transitions into a sweeter, more pastoral theme. Throughout the movement, the dueling themes fight for the spotlight at times blending and weaving into one another. The finale begins with reminiscent themes from the earlier movements, the opening chorale, second movement oboe solo, and themes from the scherzo. Near the end of the movement Bruckner’s mastery of counterpoint is featured in an extensive double fugue.

R. Strauss’ Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks

Notes by TŌN oboist Jasper Igusa

The Merry Prankster
Richard Strauss depicts the pranks and misadventures of the German peasant folk hero Till Eulenspiegel in his tone poem Till Eulenspiegels lustige Streiche (Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks). The title character, an infamous trickster always portrayed as the protagonist, precedes Strauss’ work by hundreds of years. His origins are murky, but Till’s first recorded appearance was in a German chapbook in 1515, published by an unknown author who signed their writings only with an “N.” The trickster archetype of Till Eulenspiegel has been adapted since then, including a notable novel written in 1867 that characterizes him as a heroic Flemish prankster during the Dutch Revolt against Spanish rule in the Netherlands.

The Music
Strauss’ rendition sticks closer to Till’s origin story. His work opens with what has been described as the musical equivalent to a “Once upon a time” prologue. The piece, and the story it tells, begins in earnest with the first of two themes that represents Till Eulenspiegel himself, played by the French Horn. The orchestra takes over this theme and concludes this section with two repeated notes. Then the second theme arrives, played by an unaccompanied E-flat clarinet. Although some scholars have suggested a detailed sequence of events that Strauss has depicted, from a horse ride to a marketplace to a run-in with the Teutonic clergy, Strauss was not in the business of assigning a detailed story. One is in a much better position to appreciate Strauss’ work if the bulk of the “story” is left for their own imagination and interpretation. That is, save for the graphic ending of the work.

A New Ending
In the original publication, Till dies of the plague in 1350; the infamous “Black Death.” In Strauss’ work, however, Till meets his end at the gallows, sentenced to death for blasphemy. The tutti brass section represents the strong arm of the law while the E-flat clarinet interjects in vain with its theme. The clarinet belts out what sounds like a death scream as the drop begins, and pizzicato strings conclude his death scene. Immediately following, the “Once upon a time” material returns, affirming that the character of Till Eulenspiegel lives on, even though Strauss’ rendition has come to a close.