Season Five of “Sight & Sound” is now on sale!

Tickets are now available for the 2019–20 season of The Orchestra Now’s popular series Sight & Sound at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. At each event, conductor and music historian Leon Botstein explores the parallels between orchestral music and the visual arts. First, a discussion is accompanied by musical excerpts performed by The Orchestra Now, and on-screen artworks. Then, a full performance and audience Q&A.

In season five we’ll look at the connections between chivalry and StraussDon Quixote, 18th century technology and Haydn‘s The Clock, and the music of Arthur Honegger and the artwork of Félix Vallotton.

3-concert packages start at just $75. Single tickets from $30. All tickets include museum admission.

>EXPLORE THE SEASON

Photo by David DeNee

Subscriptions Now Available for Season Five at the Fisher Center

Subscription packages for the 2019–20 season of concerts at Bard’s Fisher Center for the Performing Arts are now available. Single concert tickets go on sale in July.

Our 5-Concert Series includes symphonies by Beethoven, Copland, Schubert, Shostakovich, and others.

With our Choose Your Own Series you can choose 3 or more of these concerts, or either of our special event concerts, which feature Stravinsky’s The Fairy’s Kiss, and a performance of Mahler’s massive Resurrection symphony.

For more information on subscription packages, visit our Subscriptions page.
Or visit the Fisher Center Series page to explore the concerts.

Photo by Matt Dine

Calling All Strings!

The Orchestra Now is still accepting applications for all string positions. If you are interested in joining this innovative graduate-level training orchestra and pursuing either a 3-year Master’s Degree or 2-year certificate in Curatorial, Critical, and Performance Studies, we want to hear from you!

Don’t delay, apply today!

For more info on the program, click here.
To apply, click here.

Photo by David DeNee

TŌN’s Musicians Preview Upcoming Performances

Find out what the musicians of The Orchestra Now think about their upcoming performances in our video series This Season With TŌN.

Watch for these enlightening videos before each of our concerts at Bard’s Fisher Center, Carnegie Hall, and Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Rose Theater.

Hear TŌN on “Performance Today”

The Orchestra Now will once again be featured on America’s most popular classical music radio program, Performance Today, this Wednesday, November 14, with our performance of Jennifer Higdon’s blue cathedral . Listen online starting at 9 AM Wednesday. Hudson Valley residents can also tune in to WMHT-FM 89.1 or WRHV-FM 88.7 at 8 PM Wednesday evening.

To keep up on all of TŌN’s radio appearances, visit the Watch & Listen page on this website and click on “Radio Schedule.”

>MORE INFO ON PERFORMANCE TODAY

TŌN Begins a New Season on WMHT Live!

The Orchestra Now is thrilled to once again have our concerts broadcast on WMHT Live! Tune in to WMHT-FM 89.1/88.7, serving Eastern New York and Western New England, to hear our concerts recorded live at the Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College.

For a full schedule of upcoming broadcasts, visit the Watch & Listen page on this website and click on “Radio Schedule.”

>MORE INFO ON WMHT LIVE

Meet the Musicians of TŌN

All season long we’ll be introducing you to our fabulous musicians in the video series Meet the Musicians of TŌN.

Get to know a little more about their journeys and what it’s like to pursue music as a career.

TŌN Debuts on WWFM

Starting September 28, 2018, TŌN debuts on WWFM – The Classical Network. Live stream online or listen in NJ and eastern PA on 89.1 FM or 91.1 FM.

To see the schedule of future TŌN appearances on WWFM, visit the Watch & Listen page on this website and click on “Radio Schedule.”

>MORE INFO ON WWFM

New Video Series: 60-Second Thumbnails

We are proud to debut our newest video series, 60-Second Thumbnails.

In each video, TŌN oboist Kelly Mozeik gives you a quick rundown of all the essential information you might want to know before hearing a piece performed in concert. Watch for new videos in this series before each TŌN concert at Bard’s Fisher Center, Carnegie Hall, and Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Rose Theater.

TŌN’s Elias Rodriguez on Weber’s Clarinet Concerto No. 1

Elias Rodriguez, winner of The Orchestra Now’s 2017 Concerto Competition, performed Weber’s Clarinet Concerto No. 1 with the orchestra on February 17 and 18, 2018. Below are his thoughts on this piece. 

There is no doubt that the clarinet was Carl Maria von Weber’s favorite wind instrument. Weber’s contributions to clarinet literature are significant and of comparable importance to that of Mozart and Brahms. It was only during the second half of the 18th century that the clarinet was sufficiently developed to become generally accepted as an orchestral and solo instrument. And between the years 1811 and 1816, Weber wrote no fewer than seven compositions featuring the clarinet. These include the Quintet Op. 34, a concertino, two concerti, and the Grand Duo Concertant, Op. 48, all of which (except the Duo) were written for the renowned clarinetist of the period, Heinrich Baermann (1784–1847). The First Concerto, composed in 1811, came about from a commission by Maximilian Joseph, King of Bavaria, after the success that the composer had with his Concertino Op. 26, written just before. The musicians of the orchestra begged Weber to write a concerto for their respective instrument, but to their dismay, he responded by writing a trio of pieces for solo clarinet.

I initially chose this concerto for the first movement theme introduced by the orchestra. From the onset, the music is full of drama. I fell in love with the decorative melodies contrasted by dramatic statements from the orchestra, and there is something captivating to me about the key of F minor, which though somber in sound, allows for a lot of expression—and it is no wonder. Non-clarinetists know Weber prominently for his opera overtures, most notably Der Freischütz, Oberon, and Euryanthe. And this concerto is essentially an opera in one act without words.

In my lessons of this piece, my teacher emphasized the importance of singing through my instrument, and I was encouraged to attend or listen to more opera, in order to better emulate the early German romantic style.

The second movement Adagio resembles largely and demonstrates the influence of the second movement Adagio from Mozart’s Clarinet Concerto in A major, K. 622, written just 20 years before. The melody is melancholic, and the long phrases test the soloist’s air control.

Characteristic of ending most concerti from the Classical and early Romantic period, the third and finale movement is a rondo. In a rondo, a principal theme (typically jovial and light in character) alternates with one or more contrasting themes.

Weber writes a number of expressive markings throughout the concerto, among them con duolo (with pain), morendo (dying), con anima (with soul), lusingando (flattering), scherzando (joking), con fuoco (with fire).

I try to live my life as peaceful as possible, but when it comes to music, bring all of the drama! I’ve known since I was a very young clarinetist that if I ever had the honor to stand in front of an orchestra, I would play Weber, without a second thought.

Photo by Jake Luttinger