THE ORCHESTRA NOW ANNOUNCES TWO ADDITIONAL SYMPHONIC CONCERTS TO BE LIVESTREAMED AS PART OF ITS FALL SEASON ON NOVEMBER 1 AND 14, 2020

STAY TŌNED, The Orchestra’s New Digital Platform, Has Featured
More Than 60 Audio and Video Streams Since April 2020

Annandale-on-Hudson, NY, October 23, 2020 The Orchestra Now (TŌN) has announced the addition of two more symphonic concerts to be livestreamed for free as part of its fall season. On November 1, Music Director and Founder Leon Bostein will conduct a program pairing 20th century works by Schoenberg, Mexican composer Silvestre Revueltas, and R. Strauss with Handel’s Water Music; and on November 14, he will lead the Orchestra in the rarely heard Scherzi musicali by Black American composer Ulysses Kay. The concert will also feature Haydn’s Symphony No. 48 and works by Varèse and Hindemith. The livestreamed concerts are free and will be available for streaming after the performances.

The November concerts follow the Orchestra’s earlier fall livestreamed series Out of the Silence: A Celebration of Music, a four-concert virtual celebration of music showcasing Black composers presented with the Bard Music Festival in September; and the October 17 performance of string concertos by Polish, Czech, and Brazilian composers conducted by Zachary Schwartzman. All concerts will be made available on TŌN’s website. The additional November performances will be the final concerts livestreamed from the Fisher Center at Bard in TŌN’s fall season. The graduate students will finish with their academic courses for the remainder of the semester and then return in February 2021 to continue their academic and musical activities.

STAY TŌNED
TŌN has presented more than 60 audio and video streams since April 2020. They are offered on STAY TŌNED, its new portal regrouping all digital initiatives. The events feature weekly new and archived audio and video recordings showcasing recitals, chamber music, and symphonic programs, including collaborations with the Bard Music Festival that are also available on the Fisher Center at Bard’s virtual stage, UPSTREAMING. Some of the performances, such as the Sunset Serenade series, were performed outdoors for physically distanced audiences. Much of the content is also available on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Handel & Strauss
Sunday, November 1, 2020 at 2 PM
This concert pairs three works from the early 20th century—including R. Strauss’ elegiac Metamorphosen, written in the final months of WWII, and one of Mexican composer Silvestre Revueltas’ earliest orchestral compositions, Cuauhnáhuac—with Handel’s Baroque Water Music Suite, composed for one of King George I’s royal water parties on the River Thames in 1717.
Leon Botstein, conductor
Handel: Water Music Suite No. 1
Schoenberg: Chamber Symphony No. 1
Silvestre Revueltas: Cuauhnáhuac
Strauss: Metamorphosen

ACCESS: RSVP here to receive a direct link to the livestream on the day of the concert. This concert will be available for delayed streaming on STAY TŌNED starting on November 5.

Haydn’s Maria Theresa
Saturday, November 14, 2020 at 5:30 PM
Leon Botstein conducts three 20th-century works that all premiered in the U.S.—including the rarely heard Scherzi musicali by Black American composer Ulysses Kay, who taught at Lehman College in the Bronx for twenty years—along with Haydn‘s regal Maria Theresa Symphony, performed for the Holy Roman Empress in 1773.
Leon Botstein, conductor
Blair McMillen, piano
Varèse: Hyperprism
Hindemith: Concert Music for Piano, Brass, and Harps
Ulysses Kay: Scherzi musicali
Haydn: Symphony No. 48, Maria Theresa

ACCESS: RSVP here to receive a direct link to the livestream on the day of the concert. This concert will be available for delayed streaming on STAY TŌNED starting on November 19.

Bard College Academic Year and Safety
To adapt to current circumstances, Bard College created detailed protocols for testing and screening, daily monitoring of symptoms, contact tracing, quarantine practices, and physical distancing in the classroom and across the Bard campus. This includes specific protocols for musicians campus-wide in both its undergraduate and graduate programs.  TŌN has successfully pivoted its activities to comply and in addition to physically distanced rehearsals, the musicians have resumed their academic coursework. Since August, procedures required a separation of brass and wind instruments from the larger ensemble. Currently, restrictions on winds and brass have been eased, and limited numbers may be added to the Orchestra. This can be credited to Bard’s diligent testing and protocols.

The Orchestra Now
The Orchestra Now (TŌN) is a group of 72 vibrant young musicians from 14 different countries across the globe: Bulgaria, China, Costa Rica, Hungary, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Mongolia, Peru, Spain, Taiwan, Thailand, the U.K., and the U.S. All share a mission to make orchestral music relevant to 21st-century audiences by sharing their unique personal insights in a welcoming environment. Hand-picked from the world’s leading conservatories—including The Juilliard School, Shanghai Conservatory of Music, Royal Conservatory of Brussels, and the Curtis Institute of Music—the members of TŌN are enlightening curious minds by giving on-stage introductions and demonstrations, writing concert notes from the musicians’ perspective, and having one-on-one discussions with patrons during intermissions.

Conductor, educator, and music historian Leon Botstein, whom The New York Times said “draws rich, expressive playing from the orchestra,” founded TŌN in 2015 as a graduate program at Bard College, where he is also president. TŌN offers both a three-year master’s degree in Curatorial, Critical, and Performance Studies and a two-year advanced certificate in Orchestra Studies. The orchestra’s home base is the Frank Gehry-designed Fisher Center at Bard, where they perform multiple concerts each season and take part in the annual Bard Music Festival. They also perform regularly at the finest venues in New York, including Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and others across NYC and beyond. HuffPost, who has called TŌN’s performances “dramatic and intense,” praises these concerts as “an opportunity to see talented musicians early in their careers.”

The Orchestra has performed with many distinguished guest conductors and soloists, including Hans Graf, Neeme Järvi, Vadim Repin, Fabio Luisi, Peter Serkin, Gerard Schwarz, Tan Dun, Zuill Bailey, and JoAnn Falletta. Recordings featuring The Orchestra Now include two albums of piano concertos with Piers Lane on Hyperion Records, and a Sorel Classics concert recording of pianist Anna Shelest performing works by Anton Rubinstein with TŌN and conductor Neeme Järvi. Buried Alive with baritone Michael Nagy, released on Bridge Records in August 2020, includes the first recording in almost 60 years—and only the second recording ever—of Othmar Schoeck’s song-cycle Lebendig begraben. Upcoming releases include an album of piano concertos with Orion Weiss on Bridge Records. Recordings of TŌN’s live concerts from the Fisher Center can be heard on Classical WMHT-FM and WWFM The Classical Network, and are featured regularly on Performance Today, broadcast nationwide. In 2019, the orchestra’s performance with Vadim Repin was live-streamed on The Violin Channel.

For upcoming activities and more detailed information about the musicians, visit theorchestranow.org.

Leon Botstein
Leon Botstein brings a renowned career as both a conductor and educator to his role as music director of The Orchestra Now. He has been music director of the American Symphony Orchestra since 1992, artistic co-director of Bard SummerScape and the Bard Music Festival since their creation, and president of Bard College since 1975. He was the music director of the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra from 2003–11 and is now conductor laureate. In 2018, he assumed artistic directorship of Campus Grafenegg and Grafenegg Academy in Austria. Mr. Botstein is also a frequent guest conductor with orchestras around the globe, has made numerous recordings, and is a prolific author and music historian. He is editor of the prestigious The Musical Quarterly and has received many honors for his contributions to music. More info online at LeonBotstein.com.

Press Contacts
Pascal Nadon
Pascal Nadon Communications
Phone: 646.234.7088
Email: pascal@pascalnadon.com

Mark Primoff
Associate Vice President of Communications
Bard College
Phone: 845.758.7412
Email: primoff@bard.edu

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THE ORCHESTRA NOW RELEASES BURIED ALIVE, A NEW RECORDING ON BRIDGE RECORDS

Annandale-on-Hudson, NY, August 28, 2020 — The Orchestra Now (TŌN) has just released a new CD on Bridge Records titled Buried Alive, recorded at the Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College in November 2019. The Orchestra is led by conductor Leon Botstein and features German baritone Michael Nagy in Othmar Schoeck’s song cycle Buried Alive—adapted from Gottfried Keller’s poem Lebendig begraben—about a man who wakes up to find he has been buried by mistake. This release marks only the second recording ever of Lebendig begraben, since a 1962 recording with Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau almost 60 years ago. The album also includes Honegger’s wildly rhythmic Rugby, written to evoke the spirit of the game, and the only known recording of Mitropoulos’ 1929 Concerto Grosso, considered by the composer to be his best work.

All three works on this CD were written in the 1920s, a time of unprecedented experimentation and innovation in all the arts, including music. Composers from Schoenberg to Stravinsky and Bartók to Prokofiev became pioneers of musical modernism and Buried Alive brings together three composers of vastly different backgrounds during that turbulent decade.

Buried Alive, on Bridge Records
Leon Botstein, conductor
Michael Nagy, baritone
The Bard Festival Chorale

Schoeck: Buried Alive
Honegger: Rugby
Mitropoulos: Concerto Grosso

Digital files of the recording are available on request for press use.

To view the full list of TON’s CDs, click here.

The Orchestra Now
The Orchestra Now (TŌN) is a group of 72 vibrant young musicians from 14 different countries across the globe: Bulgaria, China, Costa Rica, Hungary, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Mongolia, Peru, Spain, Taiwan, Thailand, the U.K., and the U.S. All share a mission to make orchestral music relevant to 21st-century audiences by sharing their unique personal insights in a welcoming environment. Hand-picked from the world’s leading conservatories—including The Juilliard School, Shanghai Conservatory of Music, Royal Conservatory of Brussels, and the Curtis Institute of Music—the members of TŌN are enlightening curious minds by giving on-stage introductions and demonstrations, writing concert notes from the musicians’ perspective, and having one-on-one discussions with patrons during intermissions.

Conductor, educator, and music historian Leon Botstein, whom The New York Times said “draws rich, expressive playing from the orchestra,” founded TŌN in 2015 as a graduate program at Bard College, where he is also president. TŌN offers both a three-year master’s degree in Curatorial, Critical, and Performance Studies and a two-year advanced certificate in Orchestra Studies. The orchestra’s home base is the Frank Gehry-designed Fisher Center at Bard, where they perform multiple concerts each season and take part in the annual Bard Music Festival. They also perform regularly at the finest venues in New York, including Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and others across NYC and beyond. HuffPost, who has called TŌN’s performances “dramatic and intense,” praises these concerts as “an opportunity to see talented musicians early in their careers.”

The Orchestra has performed with many distinguished guest conductors and soloists, including Hans Graf, Neeme Järvi, Vadim Repin, Fabio Luisi, Peter Serkin, Gerard Schwarz, Tan Dun, Zuill Bailey, and JoAnn Falletta. Recordings featuring The Orchestra Now include two albums of piano concertos with Piers Lane on Hyperion Records, and a Sorel Classics concert recording of pianist Anna Shelest performing works by Anton Rubinstein with TŌN and conductor Neeme Järvi. Buried Alive with baritone Michael Nagy, released on Bridge Records in August 2020, includes the first recording in almost 60 years—and only the second recording ever—of Othmar Schoeck’s song-cycle Lebendig begraben. Upcoming releases include an album of piano concertos with Orion Weiss on Bridge Records. Recordings of TŌN’s live concerts from the Fisher Center can be heard on Classical WMHT-FM and WWFM The Classical Network, and are featured regularly on Performance Today, broadcast nationwide. In 2019, the orchestra’s performance with Vadim Repin was live-streamed on The Violin Channel.

For upcoming activities and more detailed information about the musicians, visit theorchestranow.org.

Leon Botstein
Leon Botstein brings a renowned career as both a conductor and educator to his role as music director of The Orchestra Now. He has been music director of the American Symphony Orchestra since 1992, artistic co-director of Bard SummerScape and the Bard Music Festival since their creation, and president of Bard College since 1975. He was the music director of the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra from 2003–11 and is now conductor laureate. In 2018, he assumed artistic directorship of Campus Grafenegg and Grafenegg Academy in Austria. Mr. Botstein is also a frequent guest conductor with orchestras around the globe, has made numerous recordings, and is a prolific author and music historian. He is editor of the prestigious The Musical Quarterly and has received many honors for his contributions to music. More info online at LeonBotstein.com.

Press Contacts
Pascal Nadon
Pascal Nadon Communications
Phone: 646.234.7088
Email: pascal@pascalnadon.com

Mark Primoff
Associate Vice President of Communications
Bard College
Phone: 845.758.7412
Email: primoff@bard.edu

“STAY TŌNED” WITH THE ORCHESTRA NOW

TŌN OFFERS FREE WEEKLY AUDIO & VIDEO STREAMS ON MULTIPLE PLATFORMS

LATEST STREAM EVENT IS IVES’ DECORATION DAY
ON TUESDAY MAY 26, 2020

Presentations Include Live-Streamed House Concerts, Music & Interviews from TŌN Musicians at Home, and Audio & Video of Past Performances, Some Never Before Released

Fisher Center at Bard’s UPSTREAMING Series Features TŌN in
Korngold‘s A Passover Psalm, Rimsky-Korsakov‘s Overture to May Night, and More

Annandale-on-Hudson, NY, May 26, 2020 —The Orchestra Now (TŌN) keeps the music coming through its new digital initiative STAY TŌNED, a free weekly series of audio and video streams, respectively available on Tuesdays and Thursdays, as well as other musical options that can be enjoyed on multiple platforms from home mask-free. The latest streaming event is an audio performance of Ives’ Decoration Day on Tuesday, May 26. Online content is accessible at theorchestranow.org/stay-toned/ and on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram at @theorchnow. A detailed schedule follows below.

STAY TŌNED will include more than past performances. TŌN IN will offer new videos being released for the very first time, as well as live-streamed house concerts and interviews with the musicians at home. The new series TŌNality will feature interviews with many of the Orchestra’s graduating musicians. In addition, the Fisher Center at Bard releases new content on its UPSTREAMING virtual stage each Wednesday, often featuring TŌN recordings.

Highlights of STAY TŌNED Streaming Initiatives
Video Flashbacks – Audiences can revisit past TŌN performances by streaming videos online. Recent programs include the April 2019 concert De Profundis: Out of the Depths, with violinist Vadim Repin in the U.S. premiere of Lera Auerbach’s Violin Concerto No. 3, and the 2018 Sight & Sound event at The Metropolitan Museum of Art featuring baritone Tyler Duncan in Shostakovich’s Suite on Verses of Michelangelo.

Audio FlashbacksArchived high-quality audio recording performances by TŌN and scheduled for online streaming include Korngold‘s Cello Concerto in C with soloist Nicholas Canellakis at the 2019 Bard Music Festival, and Reinhold Glière’s Symphony No. 3, Ilya Muromets.

TŌN IN—New Video Releases – New video releases each Thursday will offer a variety of content, including live-streamed house concerts featuring chamber works and solo performances by the musicians, many of whom are roommates in quarantine together; the new series TŌNality, featuring interviews with several of the orchestra’s graduating musicians; and other special performances from home. The Thursday, May 28 release will feature conductor James Bagwell with organist Renée Anne Louprette and TŌN musicians performing two Bach chorales—from St. John Passion and St. Matthew Passion—and answering your questions in a live Q&A. It will be accessible on Zoom by registering for the event.

Music From Home – Current and former TŌN musicians share videos from their homes, practicing and playing unique arrangements of popular songs, such as TŌN violinist Gergő Krisztián Tóth playing Whitney Houston’s “I Have Nothing” from Havana, Cuba with his wife, singer Yulaysi Tóth Miranda Ferrer.

UPSTREAMING – The Fisher Center at Bard is releasing new content on its UPSTREAMING virtual stage each Wednesday that often feature TŌN recordings. These include Bard Music Festival performances of Korngold‘s A Passover Psalm with soprano Marjorie Owens and the Bard Festival Chorale, performed on August 9, 2019; and Rimsky-Korsakov‘s Overture to May Night and Dubinushka, performed on August 10, 2018.

TŌN on the Radio – The Orchestra’s regular broadcasts on Classical WMHT-FM and WWFM–The Classical Network are continuing, as well as appearances on Performance Today, airing on public radio nationwide. Recent broadcasts include Elgar’s Symphony No. 1 and Joachim’s Hamlet Overture on Performance Today and Verdi’s Requiem and Beethoven’s Eroica Symphony on WMHT. The final concert this season will be Rimsky-Korsakov’s Symphony No. 1 and Glière’s Symphony No. 3, Ilya Muromets, on WMHT on June 28 at 6:00 pm ET.

STAY TŌNED also showcases social media and website posts including Meet the Musicians of TŌN, where the Orchestra spotlights various musicians through interviews and personal performances; and Concert Notes & Music, offering program notes from previously scheduled concerts that were written by TŌN’s talented musicians.

Academic Studies Continue
TŌN musicians continued their master’s degree coursework online throughout April and May, and also attended virtual coaching and classes with guest artists from The Cleveland Orchestra, Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, New York Philharmonic, and others. Members took part in weekly webinars led by Leon Botstein and such eminent leaders of the classical music community as conductors Leonard Slatkin, composer Joan Tower, and musicologist Christopher Gibbs. To fulfill Teaching Artist requirements, first- and second-year students served as virtual practice buddies for local middle-school youth in the Red Hook School District, while third-year string students provided virtual coaching to NYC students in the Opportunity Music Project’s Honors Orchestra. TŌN’s 14 third-year masters’ candidates completed Capstone Projects, which are equivalent to a master’s thesis.

Bard Music ConnectsTo stay in contact with their musical community, TŌN musicians take part in Bard Music Connects, a home for online initiatives and content created by all musicians at Bard College, including the Conservatory, the Music Program, and The Orchestra Now. Bard Music Connects can be found on Facebook/Instagram: @BardMusicConnects; Twitter: @BardMusConnects; YouTube; and on the Bard website.

 FLASHBACKS AND TŌN IN STREAMING PROGRAMS SCHEDULE THROUGH JULY, 2020
All audio streams will be uploaded on Tuesdays, and videos on Thursdays. They will be available starting at 11:00 am ET for archived performances, and evenings for live-stream events. Unless otherwise indicated, all programs below are accessible on YouTube.

Tuesday May 26 (audio)
Ives: Decoration Day
Program details available here

Thursday, May 28 at 7 PM on Zoom (Live-Steam video)
Bach: Virtual Universality
Conductor James Bagwell, organist Renée Anne Louprette, and musicians from The Orchestra Now perform two Bach chorales—one from St. John Passion and the other from St. Matthew Passion—and answer your questions in a live Q&A. Register here.

Tuesday, June 2 (audio)
Strauss: Ein Heldenleben & Wagner: Siegfried’s Rhine Journey
Program details available here

Thursday, June 4 (video)
Beethoven: Eroica from home
The musicians of The Orchestra Now pay tribute to their heroes, the front-line workers keeping our communities safe and healthy, with a special at-home performance of Beethoven’s “Heroic” 3rd Symphony, the Eroica.
Program details available here

Tuesday, June 9 (audio)
Rimsky-Korsakov: Symphony No. 1
Program details available here

Thursday, June 11 (video)
Rimsky-Korsakov: Scheherazade
Program details available here

Tuesday June 16 (audio)
Still: Afro-American Symphony
Ustvolskaya: Symphonic Poem No. 1
Program details available here for the Still piece, and here for the Ustvolskaya piece

Tuesday, June 30 (audio)
Copland: Symphony No. 3
Program details available here

Tuesday, July 7 (audio)
Mahler: Symphony No. 7
Program details available here

Tuesday, July 14 (audio)
Gershwin: An American in Paris
Program details available here

Tuesday, July 21 (audio)
Schubert:  Symphony No. 9
Program details available here

The Orchestra Now
The Orchestra Now (TŌN) is a group of 65 vibrant young musicians from 12 different countries across the globe: Bulgaria, China, Hungary, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Mongolia, Peru, Taiwan, Ukraine, the U.K., and the U.S. All share a mission to make orchestral music relevant to 21st-century audiences by sharing their unique personal insights in a welcoming environment. Hand-picked from the world’s leading conservatories—including The Juilliard School, Shanghai Conservatory of Music, Royal Conservatory of Brussels, and the Curtis Institute of Music—the members of TŌN are enlightening curious minds by giving on-stage introductions and demonstrations, writing concert notes from the musicians’ perspective, and having one-on-one discussions with patrons during intermissions.

Conductor, educator, and music historian Leon Botstein, whom The New York Times said “draws rich, expressive playing from the orchestra,” founded TŌN in 2015 as a graduate program at Bard College, where he is also president. TŌN offers both a three-year master’s degree in Curatorial, Critical, and Performance Studies and a two-year advanced certificate in Orchestra Studies. The orchestra’s home base is the Frank Gehry-designed Fisher Center at Bard, where they perform multiple concerts each season and take part in the annual Bard Music Festival. They also perform regularly at the finest venues in New York, including Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and others across NYC and beyond. HuffPost, who has called TŌN’s performances “dramatic and intense,” praises these concerts as “an opportunity to see talented musicians early in their careers.”

The Orchestra has performed with many distinguished guest conductors and soloists, including Hans Graf, Neeme Järvi, Vadim Repin, Fabio Luisi, Peter Serkin, Gerard Schwarz, Tan Dun, Zuill Bailey, and JoAnn Falletta. Recordings featuring The Orchestra Now include Ferdinand Ries piano concertos with Piers Lane on Hyperion Records, and a Sorel Classics concert recording of pianist Anna Shelest performing works by Anton Rubinstein with TŌN and conductor Neeme Järvi. Upcoming albums include a second release with Piers Lane on Hyperion Records in the summer of 2020. Recordings of TŌN’s live concerts from the Fisher Center can be heard on Classical WMHT-FM and WWFM The Classical Network, and are featured regularly on Performance Today, broadcast nationwide. In 2019, the orchestra’s performance with Vadim Repin was live-streamed on The Violin Channel.

For upcoming activities and more detailed information about the musicians, visit theorchestranow.org.

Leon Botstein
Leon Botstein brings a renowned career as both a conductor and educator to his role as music director of The Orchestra Now. He has been music director of the American Symphony Orchestra since 1992, artistic co-director of Bard SummerScape and the Bard Music Festival since their creation, and president of Bard College since 1975. He was the music director of the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra from 2003–11 and is now conductor laureate. In 2018, he assumed artistic directorship of Campus Grafenegg and Grafenegg Academy in Austria. Mr. Botstein is also a frequent guest conductor with orchestras around the globe, has made numerous recordings, and is a prolific author and music historian. He is editor of the prestigious The Musical Quarterly and has received many honors for his contributions to music. More info online at LeonBotstein.com.

Press Contacts
Pascal Nadon
Pascal Nadon Communications
Phone: 646.234.7088
Email: pascal@pascalnadon.com

Mark Primoff
Associate Vice President of Communications
Bard College
Phone: 845.758.7412
Email: primoff@bard.edu

# # #

LEONARD SLATKIN LEADS THE ORCHESTRA NOW IN RACHMANINOFF’S SYMPHONY NO. 2 AT JAZZ AT LINCOLN CENTER’S ROSE THEATER, SUNDAY MARCH 22

Program Includes New York City Premieres of Leonard Slatkin’s Kinah and
Cindy McTee’s Double Play

Annandale-on-Hudson, NY, February 24, 2020 — The Orchestra Now (TŌN) will give the second and final concert this season of its Rose Theater series at Jazz at Lincoln Center on Sunday, March 22, 2020 at 3 pm. Six-time Grammy Award-winner and Detroit Symphony Orchestra Music Director Laureate Leonard Slatkin will guest conduct the Orchestra in the New York City premiere of Kinah, an elegy he wrote for his late parents. The concert marks his first performance with the young musicians of TŌN. The afternoon will also include the New York City premiere of Cindy McTee’s Double Play, a work she dedicated to Slatkin; three short works by Leonard Slatkin’s father, the American violinist Felix Slatkin, founder of the popular Hollywood String Quartet; and Rachmaninoff’s haunting second symphony.

Mr. Slatkin celebrates his 75th birthday year this season by appearing with several of the orchestras he has led over the course of his 50-year career, including the St. Louis, Detroit, Nashville, and National Symphony Orchestras. This season also marks his debuts with the KBS Symphony Orchestra in Seoul, NDR Radiophilharmonie in Hannover, and Würth Philharmonic in Künzelsau, Germany. A recipient of the prestigious National Medal of Arts, Mr. Slatkin continues a vigorous schedule of guest conducting engagements around the world and is active as a composer, author, and educator.

TON Rose Theater Series: Slatkin Conducts Rachmaninoff
Sun, Mar 22, 2020 at 3 PM
Leonard Slatkin, conductor
Cindy McTee: Double Play (NYC Premiere)
Leonard Slatkin: Kinah (NYC Premiere)
Felix Slatkin: Fisher’s Hornpipe
Felix Slatkin: Wistful Haven
Felix Slatkin: Carmen’s Hoe-Down
Rachmaninoff: Symphony No. 2

Tickets priced at $25–$50 are available online at jazz.org, by calling CenterCharge at 212.721.6500, or at the Jazz at Lincoln Center box office at Broadway & 60th, Ground Floor.

The Orchestra Now
The Orchestra Now (TŌN) is a group of 65 vibrant young musicians from 12 different countries across the globe: Bulgaria, Canada, China, Hungary, Indonesia, Korea, Mongolia, Peru, Spain, Ukraine, the U.K., and the U.S. All share a mission to make orchestral music relevant to 21st-century audiences by sharing their unique personal insights in a welcoming environment. Hand-picked from the world’s leading conservatories—including The Juilliard School, Shanghai Conservatory of Music, Royal Conservatory of Brussels, and the Curtis Institute of Music—the members of TŌN are enlightening curious minds by giving on-stage introductions and demonstrations, writing concert notes from the musicians’ perspective, and having one-on-one discussions with patrons during intermissions.

Conductor, educator, and music historian Leon Botstein, whom The New York Times said “draws rich, expressive playing from the orchestra,” founded TŌN in 2015 as a graduate program at Bard College, where he is also president. TŌN offers both a three-year master’s degree in Curatorial, Critical, and Performance Studies and a two-year advanced certificate in Orchestra Studies. The orchestra’s home base is the Frank Gehry-designed Fisher Center at Bard, where they perform multiple concerts each season and take part in the annual Bard Music Festival. They also perform regularly at the finest venues in New York, including Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and others across NYC and beyond. HuffPost, who has called TŌN’s performances “dramatic and intense,” praises these concerts as “an opportunity to see talented musicians early in their careers.”

The Orchestra has performed with many distinguished guest conductors and soloists, including Neeme Järvi, Vadim Repin, Fabio Luisi, Peter Serkin, Gerard Schwarz, Tan Dun, Zuill Bailey, and JoAnn Falletta. In the 2019–20 season, conductors Leonard Slatkin and Hans Graf will also lead TŌN performances. Recordings featuring The Orchestra Now include Ferdinand Ries piano concertos with Piers Lane on Hyperion Records, and a Sorel Classics concert recording of pianist Anna Shelest performing works by Anton Rubinstein with TŌN and conductor Neeme Järvi. Upcoming albums include a second release with Piers Lane on Hyperion Records in the spring of 2020. Recordings of TŌN’s live concerts from the Fisher Center can be heard on Classical WMHT-FM and WWFM The Classical Network, and are featured regularly on Performance Today, broadcast nationwide. In 2019, the orchestra’s performance with Vadim Repin was live-streamed on The Violin Channel.

For upcoming activities and more detailed information about the musicians, visit theorchestranow.org.

Press Contacts
Pascal Nadon
Pascal Nadon Communications
Phone: 646.234.7088
Email: pascal@pascalnadon.com

Mark Primoff
Associate Vice President of Communications
Bard College
Phone: 845.758.7412
Email: primoff@bard.edu

# # #

THE ORCHESTRA NOW 2020 WINTER-SPRING SEASON

16 CONCERTS AT CARNEGIE HALL, THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART, LINCOLN CENTER, PETER NORTON SYMPHONY SPACE, AND THE FISHER CENTER AT BARD
JANUARY 25 – MAY 17

U.S. Premiere of César Franck’s What You Hear on the Mountain
New York City Premieres of Cindy McTee’s Double Play and Leonard Slatkin’s Kinah
Three Free Concerts in Manhattan and Beyond

Guest Artists Feature Conductor Leonard Slatkin, Pianists Blair McMillen and Anna Polonsky,
and Soprano Diana Schwam

Annandale-on-Hudson, NY, January 8, 2020 — The Orchestra Now (TŌN) continues its vibrant fifth anniversary, featuring 16 performances and 3 premieres at Carnegie Hall, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Lincoln Center, Peter Norton Symphony Space, and the Fisher Center at Bard. The season will mark the presentation of more than 150 concerts since the Orchestra was founded in 2015.

TŌN’s enthusiastic winter-spring schedule kicks off as the Orchestra performs in The Sound of Spring, a Chinese New Year concert presented by the US-China Music Institute of the Bard College Conservatory of Music and the Central Conservatory of Music, China (Jan. 25 at the Fisher Center at Bard & Jan. 26 at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Rose Theater). This is followed by three February concerts: an all-Beethoven program at Bard College’s Fisher Center in tribute to the 250th anniversary of the great master’s birth with pianist Anna Polonsky, a recipient of the Andrew Wolf Chamber Music Award and frequent guest with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center (Feb. 8-9); a FREE concert at Manhattan’s Symphony Space  led by TŌN’s resident conductor Zachary Schwartzman offering Ravel’s Boléro and Stravinsky’s Petrushka (Feb. 16); and the final installment this season of TŌN’s top-selling Sight & Sound series at The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Haydn’s The Clock: The Intersection of Art & Technology (Feb. 23).

Notable premieres include the U.S. premiere of César Franck’s What You Hear on the Mountain—likely the very first symphonic poem in history—at the Fisher Center at Bard on April 25–26 (with the NYC premiere following at Carnegie Hall on April 30). The program will feature pianist Blair McMillen, a winner of Juilliard’s Gina Bachauer Competition and faculty member of both Bard College Conservatory and the Mannes School of Music; and Filipino-American soprano Diana Schwam. On March 22, Grammy-winner Leonard Slatkin will guest conduct the NY City premiere of Kinah, an elegy he wrote for his parents, at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Rose Theater. The afternoon will also include the NY City premiere of Cindy McTee’s Double Play, a work she dedicated to Slatkin.

An audience favorite will be the performance of Mahler’s massive Resurrection Symphony, featuring the combined forces of The Orchestra Now, the Bard Conservatory Orchestra, Bard College Chamber Singers and Bard Festival Chorale, led by conductor James Bagwell at the Fisher Center at Bard (May 9-10).

FREE concerts, in addition to the New York City Boléro & Petrushka performance at Peter Norton Symphony Space (Feb. 16), will include an afternoon led by associate conductor James Bagwell with the Bard Festival Chorale in a program of Mozart, Bach and Mendelssohn at Hudson Hall in Hudson, NY (Mar. 29); and a return to Symphony Space in Manhattan with conductor Zachary Schwartzman in works by Liszt and Bartók (May 17).

THE ORCHESTRA NOW 2020 WINTER-SPRING SCHEDULE

Special Event: The Sound of Spring
Sat, Jan 25, 2020 at 7 PM at the Fisher Center at Bard, Sosnoff Theater, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY
Sun, Jan 26, 2020 at 3 PM at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Frederick P. Rose Hall, Rose Theater
Presented by the US-China Music Institute of the Bard College Conservatory of Music and the Central Conservatory of Music, China
Celebrate Lunar New Year and look forward to spring with a lively concert of Chinese orchestral works performed by The Orchestra Now. Soloists from the Central Conservatory’s world-class faculty in traditional instruments will perform on Chinese percussion, erhu, pipa, sheng and suona.
Chen Bing, conductor (first half)
Jindong Cai, conductor (second half)
Wang Jianhua, percussion
Wang Lei, sheng
Yu Hongmei, erhu
Zhang Hongyan, pipa
Zhang WeiWei, suona
Ji Tian, Shaanxi folk singer

Tickets for the Jan 25 concert are priced at $20 and may be purchased online at fishercenter.bard.edu, by calling the Fisher Center at 845.758.7900, or at the Fisher Center box office in the lobby of Sosnoff Theater.

Tickets for the Jan 26 concert are priced at $25 and are available online at jazz.org, by calling CenterCharge at 212.721.6500, or at the Jazz at Lincoln Center box office at Broadway & 60th, ground floor.

TŌN Fisher Center Series: Beethoven’s Eroica
Fisher Center at Bard, Sosnoff Theater, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY
Sat, Feb 8, 2020 at 8 PM
Sun, Feb 9, 2020 at 2 PM
Leon Botstein, conductor
Anna Polonsky, piano
Beethoven:
The Consecration of the House Overture
Piano Concerto No. 4
Symphony No. 3, Eroica

Tickets priced at $25–$35 may be purchased online at fishercenter.bard.edu, by calling the Fisher Center at 845.758.7900, or at the Fisher Center box office in the lobby of Sosnoff Theater.

TŌN Free Concerts Series: Boléro & Petrushka
Peter Norton Symphony Space, New York City
Sun, Feb 16, 2020 at 4 PM
Zachary Schwartzman, conductor
Debussy: Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun
Messiaen: The Forgotten Offerings
Ravel: Boléro
Stravinsky: Petrushka (1947)

Tickets: Free concert, advance RSVP at theorchestranow.org is suggested.

TŌN Sight & Sound Series at The Metropolitan Museum of Art
The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Haydn’s The Clock: The Intersection of Art & Technology
Sun, Feb 23, 2020 at 2 PM
Leon Botstein, conductor
Haydn: Symphony No. 101, The Clock
Artwork about Technology from the exhibition Making Marvels

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Making Marvels: Science and Splendor at the Courts of Europe, on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art through March 1, 2020

Tickets priced at $30–$50; Bring the Kids for $1. All tickets include same-day museum admission. Tickets may be purchased online at metmuseum.org/sightandsound, by calling The Met at 212.570.3949, or at The Great Hall box office at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Special Event: Rest in Pieces
Fisher Center at Bard, Sosnoff Theater, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY
Fri, Mar 6, 2020 at 7:30 PM
Sun, Mar 8, 2020 at 3 PM
Presented by the Bard Conservatory Graduate Vocal Arts Program
A special performance to celebrate the life of opera. At this one of a kind ceremony, the family and friends of Mozart, Strauss, Bizet, Copland, and Puccini will share their fondest memories, explore some of their deep-seated issues, and live out their secret dreams.
James Bagwell, conductor
Soloists from Bard Conservatory’s Graduate Vocal Arts Program

Tickets priced at $15- 40  may be purchased online at fishercenter.bard.edu, by calling the Fisher Center at 845.758.7900, or at the Fisher Center box office in the lobby of Sosnoff Theater.

TŌN Rose Theater Series: Slatkin Conducts Rachmaninoff
Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Frederick P. Rose Hall
Sun, Mar 22, 2020 at 3 PM

Leonard Slatkin, conductor
Cindy McTee: Double Play (NYC Premiere)
Leonard Slatkin: Kinah (NYC Premiere)
Felix Slatkin: Fisher’s Hornpipe
Felix Slatkin: Wistful Haven
Felix Slatkin: Carmen’s Hoe-Down
Rachmaninoff: Symphony No. 2

Tickets priced at $25–$50 are available online at jazz.org, by calling CenterCharge at 212.721.6500, or at the Jazz at Lincoln Center box office at Broadway & 60th, Ground Floor.

TŌN Free Concerts Series: Mozart, Bach & Mendelssohn
Hudson Hall, Hudson, NY
Sun, Mar 29, 2020 at 3 PM
James Bagwell
, conductor
Bard Festival Chorale
Soloists from Bard’s Graduate Vocal Arts Program:
Margaret Tigue, soprano
Jardena Gertler-Jaffe, mezzo-soprano
Chuanyuan Liu, countertenor 
Maximillian Jansen, tenor
Wayne Paul, bass
Mozart: Regina Coeli, K. 276
Bach: Magnificat
Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 3, Scottish

Tickets: Free concert, advance RSVP at theorchestranow.org suggested.

TŌN Fisher Center Series: Into the Wilderness
Fisher Center at Bard, Sosnoff Theater, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY
Sat, Apr 25, 2020 at 8 PM
Sun, Apr 26, 2020 at 2 PM
Leon Botstein, conductor
Blair McMillen, piano
Diana Schwam, soprano
Members of the Bard Festival Chorale
James Bagwell, choral director
Franck: What You Hear on the Mountain (U.S. Premiere)
d’Indy: Symphony on a French Mountain Air*
Vaughan Williams: Symphony No. 7, Sinfonia Antartica*
*First NY performances in over 50 years

Tickets priced at $25–$35 may be purchased online at fishercenter.bard.edu, by calling the Fisher Center at 845.758.7900, or at the Fisher Center box office in the lobby of Sosnoff Theater.

TŌN Carnegie Hall Series: Into the Wilderness
Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
Thu, Apr 30, 2020 at 7 PM
Leon Botstein, conductor
Blair McMillen, piano
Diana Schwam, soprano
Members of the Bard Festival Chorale
James Bagwell, choral director
Franck: What You Hear on the Mountain (NYC Premiere)
d’Indy: Symphony on a French Mountain Air*
Vaughan Williams: Symphony No. 7, Sinfonia Antartica*
*First NYC performances in over 50 years

Tickets priced at $25–$60 are available online at carnegiehall.org, by calling CarnegieCharge at 212.247.7800, or at the Carnegie Hall box office at 57th & Seventh.

TŌN Fisher Center Series: Mahler’s Resurrection Symphony
Fisher Center at Bard, Sosnoff Theater, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY
Sat, May 9, 2020 at 8 PM
Sun, May 10, 2020 at 2 PM
Leon Botstein, conductor
Bard Conservatory Orchestra
Bard College Chamber Singers
Bard Festival Chorale
James Bagwell, choral director
Soloists from Bard’s Graduate Vocal Arts Program
Mahler: Symphony No. 2, Resurrection
A co-presentation with the Bard College Conservatory of Music

Tickets priced at $25–$35 may be purchased online at fishercenter.bard.edu, by calling the Fisher Center at 845.758.7900, or at the Fisher Center box office in the lobby of Sosnoff Theater.

TŌN Free Concerts Series: Liszt & Bartók
Peter Norton Symphony Space, New York City
Sun, May 17, 2020 at 4 PM
Zachary Schwartzman, conductor
Liszt: Les préludes
Kodály: Dances of Galánta
Bartók: Music for Strings, Percussion, and Celeste

Tickets: Free concert, advance RSVP at theorchestranow.org suggested.

The Orchestra Now
The Orchestra Now (TŌN) is a group of 65 vibrant young musicians from 12 different countries across the globe: Bulgaria, China, Hungary, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Mongolia, Peru, Taiwan, Ukraine, the U.K., and the U.S. All share a mission to make orchestral music relevant to 21st-century audiences by sharing their unique personal insights in a welcoming environment. Hand-picked from the world’s leading conservatories—including The Juilliard School, Shanghai Conservatory of Music, Royal Conservatory of Brussels, and the Curtis Institute of Music—the members of TŌN are enlightening curious minds by giving on-stage introductions and demonstrations, writing concert notes from the musicians’ perspective, and having one-on-one discussions with patrons during intermissions.

Conductor, educator, and music historian Leon Botstein, whom The New York Times said “draws rich, expressive playing from the orchestra,” founded TŌN in 2015 as a graduate program at Bard College, where he is also president. TŌN offers both a three-year master’s degree in Curatorial, Critical, and Performance Studies and a two-year advanced certificate in Orchestra Studies. The orchestra’s home base is the Frank Gehry-designed Fisher Center at Bard, where they perform multiple concerts each season and take part in the annual Bard Music Festival. They also perform regularly at the finest venues in New York, including Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and others across NYC and beyond. HuffPost, who has called TŌN’s performances “dramatic and intense,” praises these concerts as “an opportunity to see talented musicians early in their careers.”

The Orchestra has performed with many distinguished guest conductors and soloists, including Neeme Järvi, Vadim Repin, Fabio Luisi, Peter Serkin, Gerard Schwarz, Tan Dun, Zuill Bailey, and JoAnn Falletta. In the 2019–20 season, conductors Leonard Slatkin and Hans Graf will also lead TŌN performances. Recordings featuring The Orchestra Now include Ferdinand Ries piano concertos with Piers Lane on Hyperion Records, and a Sorel Classics concert recording of pianist Anna Shelest performing works by Anton Rubinstein with TŌN and conductor Neeme Järvi. Upcoming albums include a second release with Piers Lane on Hyperion Records in the spring of 2020. Recordings of TŌN’s live concerts from the Fisher Center can be heard on Classical WMHT-FM and WWFM The Classical Network, and are featured regularly on Performance Today, broadcast nationwide. In 2019, the orchestra’s performance with Vadim Repin was live-streamed on The Violin Channel.

For upcoming activities and more detailed information about the musicians, visit theorchestranow.org.

Leon Botstein
Leon Botstein brings a renowned career as both a conductor and educator to his role as music director of The Orchestra Now. He has been music director of the American Symphony Orchestra since 1992, artistic co-director of Bard SummerScape and the Bard Music Festival since their creation, and president of Bard College since 1975. He was the music director of the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra from 2003–11 and is now conductor laureate. In 2018, he assumed artistic directorship of Campus Grafenegg and Grafenegg Academy in Austria. Mr. Botstein is also a frequent guest conductor with orchestras around the globe, has made numerous recordings, and is a prolific author and music historian. He is editor of the prestigious The Musical Quarterly and has received many honors for his contributions to music. More info online at LeonBotstein.com.

Press Contacts
Pascal Nadon
Pascal Nadon Communications
Phone: 646.234.7088
Email: pascal@pascalnadon.com

Mark Primoff
Associate Vice President of Communications
Bard College
Phone: 845.758.7412
Email: primoff@bard.edu

# # #

BroadwayWorld: TŌN with Tan Dun at Jazz At Lincoln Center

Read full article

“A student gave an introduction to each of the works on the program. All four were personable and well-spoken, particularly Weiqiao Wu. Mr. Wu introduced the highlight of the concert, world-renowned composer and conductor  Tan Dun’s Violin Concerto: Rhapsody and Fantasia 2009What might have been a somewhat knotty, impenetrable contemporary piece was made more accessible through Mr.Wu’s explanation.

The brilliant soloist Ms. Eldbjørg Hemsing brought the music to life, articulating each note with precision and richly dynamic expression. No mere walk in the park for the violinist, this highly rhythmic, complex work allowed each section of the orchestra to shine. The lovely, warm string sound was especially appealing. There was a large percussion battery that included Chinese gongs which bent the music into inimitable Eastern sounds. Mr. Dun’s direction of the orchestra was clearly defined and dynamic. The orchestral response was instantaneous, which meant that all eyes were not only on the music, but on Mr. Dun as well. For the listener, this piece was imaginative, engaging, and downright fun to experience.

The Rhapsody for Clarinet by Claude Debussy featured TŌN clarinet soloist Viktor Tóth. Mr. Tóth’s sensitive playing was at times somewhat melancholy and nostalgic. His ability to sustain long phrases on seemingly one breath without a lapse of pitch or support was astonishingly beautiful. At all times the orchestra provided a shimmering yet delicate background for the soloist.

The Miraculous Mandarin Suite by Hungarian composer Béla Bartók was the final work of the day. This ballet begins with an authoritative trombone solo and goes on to showcase all sections of the orchestra. There were several standout section soloists, which included the aforementioned trombone and some lovely oboe playing.” – Joanna Barouch

Photo by Patrick Arias

Cadenza: The Sight and Sound of Vallotton and Honegger

Read full article

“Botstein has become the city’s preeminent music educator, a music historian to the people; each concert is a veritable course in music appreciation. TŌN’s valuable Sight & Sound series at The Metropolitan Museum of Art enhances the audience’s cultural cachet, providing context for both music and visual art.

The first movement of [Honegger’s Symphony No. 1] grabs the listener by the ear and doesn’t let go. Its rhythmically charged, angular lines recall Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring. TŌN’s virtuosic string section played with vibrant electricity, clarity, and definition. The brass section is world class. As the fast-paced music builds in emphasis, the horns contribute stunning section playing. Muted trumpet solos soar, or comment wryly. The celli, basses, and percussion maintain the integrity of the motoric pulse, grooving along with daring march. TŌN excels at crystalline intonation in complex, kaleidoscopic harmonies.

The middle movement, Adagio, is the heart of the piece. TŌN’s woodwinds make cohesive drama in slithery, sinuous dialogue. Again, the horns, with their powerful, round tone and unfailing stamina, play with maturity beyond their years. Botstein, subtly balancing dynamics, draws focused imagery from many planes of texture.

The finale, Presto-Andante tranquillo, begins adventurously, the trumpets achieving athletic feats, the trombones interjecting ironically with admirable taste. Each section of the orchestra gets put through its paces, and TŌN’s musicians collaborate skillfully, acing tight harmonies and textures.” – Brian Taylor

Photo by David DeNee

THE ORCHESTRA NOW (TŌN) – DECEMBER CONCERTS

TAN DUN TO CONDUCT U.S. PREMIERE OF HIS VIOLIN CONCERTO: RHAPSODY AND FANTASIA AT ROSE THEATER SERIES AT JAZZ AT LINCOLN CENTER SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2019

SIGHT & SOUND SERIES AT THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART CONTINUES WITH HONEGGGER, VALLOTTON & THE AVANT-GARDE IN PARIS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2019

Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, November 21, 2019Tan Dun, world-renowned composer, conductor, and Dean of the Bard College Conservatory of Music, will take the podium for the opening concert of The Orchestra Now’s Rose Theater series at Jazz at Lincoln Center on Dec. 15, 2019. The program will be highlighted by the U.S. premiere of Dun’s 2018 Violin Concerto: Rhapsody and Fantasia featuring the award-winning Norwegian violinist Eldbjørg Hemsing, who recently premiered Dun’s Fire Ritual – A Musical Ritual for Victims of War with the Oslo Philharmonic. Hemsing is also the subject of the upcoming documentary Forte directed by David Donnelly, focusing on women in the arts. Other works on the concert include Stravinsky’s Fireworks, Debussy’s Rhapsody for Clarinet with Hungarian soloist and TŌN musician Viktor Tóth; and Bartók’s The Miraculous Mandarin Suite.

Also in December, TŌN presents Honeggger, Vallotton & the Avant-Garde in Paris, the second installment of its popular Sight & Sound series at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, in which conductor and music historian Leon Botstein explores the parallels between orchestral music and the visual arts (Dec. 8, 2019).

Sight & Sound Series at The Metropolitan Museum of Art
The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Honegger, Vallotton & the Avant-Garde in Paris
Sunday December 8, 2019 at 2 PM
Composer Arthur Honegger and painter Félix Vallotton were both Swiss nationals who spent the larger part of their careers in Paris, where they became part of the avant-garde scene in music (Le Six) and art (Les Nabis). Both explored the intersection of tradition and modernism. Honegger’s first symphony mirrors the magnetism of Paris in the 1920s, and this event marks the work’s first NYC performance in 58 years. All presentations in this series offer a discussion accompanied by musical excerpts performed by The Orchestra Now, with on-screen artworks followed by a full performance and audience Q&A.

Leon Botstein, conductor
Honegger: Symphony No. 1*
The Artwork of Félix Vallotton
*First NYC performance in 58 years

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Félix Vallotton: Painter of Disquiet, on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art through January 26, 2020

Tickets priced at $30–$50; Bring the Kids for $1. All tickets include same-day museum admission. Tickets may be purchased online at metmuseum.org/sightandsound, by calling The Met at 212.570.3949, or at The Great Hall at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

TŌN Rose Theater Series
Rose Theater at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Frederick P. Rose Hall
Tan Dun Conducts Stravinsky, Debussy & Bartók
Sunday, December 15, 2019 at 3 PM
Tan Dun, conductor
Eldbjørg Hemsing, violin
Viktor Tóth, clarinet
Stravinsky: Fireworks
Tan Dun: Violin Concerto: Rhapsody and Fantasia (U.S. Premiere)
Debussy: Rhapsody for Clarinet
Bartók: The Miraculous Mandarin Suite

Tickets priced at $25–$50 are available online at jazz.org, by calling CenterCharge at 212.721.6500, or at the Jazz at Lincoln Center box office at Broadway & 60th, Ground Floor.

The Orchestra Now
The Orchestra Now (TŌN) is a group of 65 vibrant young musicians from 12 different countries across the globe: Bulgaria, China, Hungary, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Mongolia, Peru, Taiwan, Ukraine, the U.K., and the U.S. All share a mission to make orchestral music relevant to 21st-century audiences by sharing their unique personal insights in a welcoming environment. Hand-picked from the world’s leading conservatories—including The Juilliard School, Shanghai Conservatory of Music, Royal Conservatory of Brussels, and the Curtis Institute of Music—the members of TŌN are enlightening curious minds by giving on-stage introductions and demonstrations, writing concert notes from the musicians’ perspective, and having one-on-one discussions with patrons during intermissions.

Conductor, educator, and music historian Leon Botstein, whom The New York Times said “draws rich, expressive playing from the orchestra,” founded TŌN in 2015 as a graduate program at Bard College, where he is also president. TŌN offers both a three-year master’s degree in Curatorial, Critical, and Performance Studies and a two-year advanced certificate in Orchestra Studies. The orchestra’s home base is the Frank Gehry-designed Fisher Center at Bard, where they perform multiple concerts each season and take part in the annual Bard Music Festival. They also perform regularly at the finest venues in New York, including Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and others across NYC and beyond. HuffPost, who has called TŌN’s performances “dramatic and intense,” praises these concerts as “an opportunity to see talented musicians early in their careers.”

The Orchestra has performed with many distinguished guest conductors and soloists, including Neeme Järvi, Vadim Repin, Fabio Luisi, Peter Serkin, Gerard Schwarz, Tan Dun, Zuill Bailey, and JoAnn Falletta. In the 2019–20 season, conductors Leonard Slatkin, and Hans Graf will also lead TŌN performances. Recordings featuring The Orchestra Now include Ferdinand Ries piano concertos with Piers Lane on Hyperion Records, and a Sorel Classics concert recording of pianist Anna Shelest performing works by Anton Rubinstein with TŌN and conductor Neeme Järvi. Upcoming albums include a second release with Piers Lane on Hyperion Records in the spring of 2020. Recordings of TŌN’s live concerts from the Fisher Center can be heard on Classical WMHT-FM and WWFM The Classical Network, and are featured regularly on Performance Today, broadcast nationwide. In 2019, the orchestra’s performance with Vadim Repin was live-streamed on The Violin Channel.

For upcoming activities and more detailed information about the musicians, visit theorchestranow.org.

Leon Botstein
Leon Botstein brings a renowned career as both a conductor and educator to his role as music director of The Orchestra Now. He has been music director of the American Symphony Orchestra since 1992, artistic co-director of Bard SummerScape and the Bard Music Festival since their creation, and president of Bard College since 1975. He was the music director of the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra from 2003–11 and is now conductor laureate. In 2018, he assumed artistic directorship of Campus Grafenegg and Grafenegg Academy in Austria. Mr. Botstein is also a frequent guest conductor with orchestras around the globe, has made numerous recordings, and is a prolific author and music historian. He is editor of the prestigious The Musical Quarterly and has received many honors for his contributions to music. More info online at LeonBotstein.com.

Tan Dun
A world-renowned artist and UNESCO Global Goodwill Ambassador, Tan Dun is a winner of the Grammy, Academy, Grawemeyer, and Shostakovich Awards; the Bach Prize; and most recently Italy’s Golden Lion Award for Lifetime Achievement. His current season includes leading the Orchestre National de Lyon in a five-city China tour, the Guangzhou Symphony Orchestra in a four-city tour of Switzerland and Belgium, as well as engagements with Oslo Philharmonic, Hong Kong Philharmonic, and Melbourne Symphony Orchestra, where he was recently named Artistic Ambassador. Mr. Dun currently serves as the Honorary Artistic Director of the China National Symphony Orchestra. Next season, he will conduct the English Chamber Orchestra in their tour to China. He has led the world’s most esteemed orchestras, including the Royal Concertgebouw, London Symphony, , Metropolitan Opera, BBC Symphony, and Sydney Symphony Orchestras; the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Orchestre National de France, and the Filarmonica della Scala; among many others.

Press Contacts
Pascal Nadon
Pascal Nadon Communications
Phone: 646.234.7088
Email: pascal@pascalnadon.com

Mark Primoff
Associate Vice President of Communications
Bard College
Phone: 845.758.7412
Email: primoff@bard.edu

# # #

THE ORCHESTRA NOW OPENS CARNEGIE HALL SEASON WITH STRAVINSKY’S SUITE FROM THE FAIRY’S KISS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14

First New York City Performances of Works by Honegger and Mitropoulos
in More Than 50 Years

Free Concert Series: The Orchestra Now Also Performs Works by Mendelssohn,
Ravel, and Mozart in Hudson on November 24

Annandale-on-Hudson, NY, October 22, 2019 — The Orchestra Now will begin its season at Carnegie Hall on November 14 with seldom-heard performances of four works from the late 1920s that give insight into the evolving world of orchestral music 90 years ago. The program will also be performed on November 13 as part of the Ensemble’s Fisher Center series at Bard College.

The evening includes the suite from Stravinsky’s ballet score The Fairy’s Kiss, written as an homage to Tchaikovsky and based on Hans Christian Andersen’s short story Isjomfruen (The Ice-Maiden). Marking their first New York City performances in more than 50 years are Honegger’s Rugby, which was written to evoke the sport of rugby and is the second of the composer’s three “mouvements symphoniques;” and Mitropoulos’ 1929 Concerto Grosso, considered by the composer to be his best work. Rounding out the program is Othmar Schoeck’s song cycle Buried Alive, adapted from Gottfried Keller’s poem Lebendig Begraben, about a man who wakes up to find he has been buried by mistake. German baritone Michael Nagy, who recently appeared as Don Alfonso in Così fan tutte at Zurich Opera House, is the soloist.

Also in November, a FREE concert led by Resident Conductor Zachary Schwartzman will offer an afternoon of selections from Mendelssohn’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Ravel’s Le tombeau de Couperin, and Mozart’s Symphony No. 39 (November 24, Hudson Hall, Hudson, New York).

The next concert at Carnegie Hall is Into the Wilderness, a program featuring the NYC premiere of César Franck’s beautiful What You Hear on the Mountain (April 30, 2020 at Carnegie Hall).

Carnegie Hall, Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
Stravinsky’s The Fairy’s Kiss
Thu, Nov 14, 2019 at 7 PM
Leon Botstein, conductor
Michael Nagy, baritone
Honegger: Rugby*
Schoeck: Buried Alive
Mitropoulos: Concerto Grosso*
Stravinsky: Divertimento, The Fairy’s Kiss Suite
*First NYC performances in over 50 years
This concert will also be performed at the Fisher Center at Bard on November 13.

Tickets priced at $25–$60 are available online at carnegiehall.org, by calling CarnegieCharge at 212.247.7800, or at the Carnegie Hall box office at 57th & Seventh Ave.

The Orchestra Now
The Orchestra Now (TŌN) is a group of 65 vibrant young musicians from 12 different countries across the globe: Bulgaria, China, Hungary, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Mongolia, Peru, Taiwan, Ukraine, the U.K., and the U.S. All share a mission to make orchestral music relevant to 21st-century audiences by sharing their unique personal insights in a welcoming environment. Hand-picked from the world’s leading conservatories—including The Juilliard School, Shanghai Conservatory of Music, Royal Conservatory of Brussels, and the Curtis Institute of Music—the members of TŌN are enlightening curious minds by giving on-stage introductions and demonstrations, writing concert notes from the musicians’ perspective, and having one-on-one discussions with patrons during intermissions.

Conductor, educator, and music historian Leon Botstein, whom The New York Times said “draws rich, expressive playing from the orchestra,” founded TŌN in 2015 as a graduate program at Bard College, where he is also president. TŌN offers both a three-year master’s degree in Curatorial, Critical, and Performance Studies and a two-year advanced certificate in Orchestra Studies. The orchestra’s home base is the Frank Gehry-designed Fisher Center at Bard, where they perform multiple concerts each season and take part in the annual Bard Music Festival. They also perform regularly at the finest venues in New York, including Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and others across NYC and beyond. HuffPost, who has called TŌN’s performances “dramatic and intense,” praises these concerts as “an opportunity to see talented musicians early in their careers.”

The Orchestra has performed with many distinguished guest conductors and soloists, including Neeme Järvi, Vadim Repin, Fabio Luisi, Peter Serkin, Gerard Schwarz, Tan Dun, Zuill Bailey, and JoAnn Falletta. In the 2019–20 season, conductors Leonard Slatkin and Hans Graf will also lead TŌN performances. Recordings featuring The Orchestra Now include Ferdinand Ries piano concertos with Piers Lane on Hyperion Records, and a Sorel Classics concert recording of pianist Anna Shelest performing works by Anton Rubinstein with TŌN and conductor Neeme Järvi. Upcoming albums include a second release with Piers Lane on Hyperion Records in the spring of 2020. Recordings of TŌN’s live concerts from the Fisher Center can be heard on Classical WMHT-FM and WWFM The Classical Network, and are featured regularly on Performance Today, broadcast nationwide. In 2019, the orchestra’s performance with Vadim Repin was live-streamed on The Violin Channel.

For upcoming activities and more detailed information about the musicians, visit theorchestranow.org.

Leon Botstein
Leon Botstein brings a renowned career as both a conductor and educator to his role as music director of The Orchestra Now. He has been music director of the American Symphony Orchestra since 1992, artistic co-director of Bard SummerScape and the Bard Music Festival since their creation, and president of Bard College since 1975. He was the music director of the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra from 2003–11 and is now conductor laureate. In 2018, he assumed artistic directorship of Campus Grafenegg and Grafenegg Academy in Austria. Mr. Botstein is also a frequent guest conductor with orchestras around the globe, has made numerous recordings, and is a prolific author and music historian. He is editor of the prestigious The Musical Quarterly and has received many honors for his contributions to music. More info online at LeonBotstein.com.

Press Contacts
Pascal Nadon
Pascal Nadon Communications
Phone: 646.234.7088
Email: pascal@pascalnadon.com

Mark Primoff
Associate Vice President of Communications
Bard College
Phone: 845.758.7412
Email: primoff@bard.edu

# # #

THE ORCHESTRA NOW BEGINS 2019 FALL SEASON IN NEW YORK CITY WITH STRAUSS’ DON QUIXOTE & THE LAST KNIGHT, THE FIRST PROGRAM IN ITS SIGHT & SOUND SERIES AT THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART OCTOBER 27, 2019

Featured Soloists are Cellist Lucas Button and Violist Leonardo Vásquez Chacón

Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, October 3, 2019 – The Orchestra Now (TŌN) will open its 2019 fall season in New York City on Oct. 27 with Strauss’ Don Quixote & The Last Knight, the first of three programs in its popular Sight & Sound series at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Emperor Maximilian I of Austria, often referred to as “the last knight,” was passionate about the exploration of chivalry and armor. There is no more influential tale of knighthood than Cervantes’ Don Quixote, which inspired Strauss’ “Fantastic Variations on a Theme of Knightly Character,” the composer’s moving musical realization of Quixote’s chivalric journey. Both soloists at this performance are talented young TŌN musicians: cellist Lucas Button, a Syracuse native, and Peruvian violist Leonardo Vásquez Chacón.

The program will be presented in conjunction with the exhibition The Last Knight: The Art, Armor, and Ambition of Maximillian I, on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art Oct. 7, 2019–Jan. 5, 2020.

The Sight & Sound series explores parallels between orchestral music and the visual arts with conductor and music historian Leon Botstein.  Each presentation offers a discussion accompanied by musical excerpts performed by The Orchestra Now with on-screen artworks, followed by a full performance and audience Q&A.

The next program in the series will be Honegger, Vallotton & the Avant-Garde in Paris, featuring the first NYC performance in 58 years of Honegger’s Symphony No. 1 (Dec. 8, 2019); followed by Haydn’s The Clock: The Intersection of Art & Technology, which focuses on Haydn’s interest in the advances of horology in Vienna and London (Feb. 23, 2020).

 

SIGHT & SOUND SERIES AT THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART
 The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium

Strauss’ Don Quixote & The Last Knight
Sun, Oct 27, 2019 at 2 PM
Leon Botstein, conductor
Lucas Button, cello
Leonardo Vásquez Chacón, viola
Strauss: Don Quixote
Artwork about Chivalry

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition The Last Knight: The Art, Armor, and Ambition of Maximillian I, on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art October 7, 2019–January 5, 2020

Honegger, Vallotton & the Avant-Garde in Paris
Sun, Dec 8, 2019 at 2 PM
Composer Arthur Honegger and painter Félix Vallotton were both Swiss nationals who spent the larger part of their careers in Paris, where they became part of the avant-garde scene in music (Le Six) and art (Les Nabis). Both explored the intersection of tradition and modernism. Honegger’s first symphony mirrors the magnetism of Paris in the 1920s.
Leon Botstein, conductor
Honegger: Symphony No. 1*
The Artwork of Félix Vallotton
*First NYC performance in 58 years

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Félix Vallotton: Painter of Disquiet, on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art October 29, 2019–January 26, 2020

Haydn’s The Clock: The Intersection of Art & Technology
Sun, Feb 23, 2020 2 PM
Musicians, like their contemporaries in art and science, were mesmerized (often literally by Franz Anton Mesmer himself) by advancements and pseudo-advancements in science and technology during the second half of the 18th century. While Mozart poked fun at this fascination in Così fan tutte, Haydn drew inspiration from the advances in horology in Vienna and London.
Leon Botstein, conductor
Haydn: Symphony No. 101, The Clock
Artwork about Technology

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Making Marvels: Science and Splendor at the Courts of Europe, on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art November 25, 2019–March 1, 2020

 

Tickets priced at $30–$50; 3-concert series from $75; Bring the Kids for $1. All tickets include same-day museum admission. Tickets may be purchased online at metmuseum.org/sightandsound, by calling The Met at 212.570.3949, or at The Great Hall box office at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

 

The Orchestra Now
The Orchestra Now (TŌN) is a group of 65 vibrant young musicians from 12 different countries across the globe: Bulgaria, China, Hungary, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Mongolia, Peru, Taiwan, Ukraine, the U.K., and the U.S. All share a mission to make orchestral music relevant to 21st-century audiences by sharing their unique personal insights in a welcoming environment. Hand-picked from the world’s leading conservatories—including The Juilliard School, Shanghai Conservatory of Music, Royal Conservatory of Brussels, and the Curtis Institute of Music—the members of TŌN are enlightening curious minds by giving on-stage introductions and demonstrations, writing concert notes from the musicians’ perspective, and having one-on-one discussions with patrons during intermissions.

Conductor, educator, and music historian Leon Botstein, whom The New York Times said “draws rich, expressive playing from the orchestra,” founded TŌN in 2015 as a graduate program at Bard College, where he is also president. TŌN offers both a three-year master’s degree in Curatorial, Critical, and Performance Studies and a two-year advanced certificate in Orchestra Studies. The orchestra’s home base is the Frank Gehry-designed Fisher Center at Bard, where they perform multiple concerts each season and take part in the annual Bard Music Festival. They also perform regularly at the finest venues in New York, including Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and others across NYC and beyond. HuffPost, who has called TŌN’s performances “dramatic and intense,” praises these concerts as “an opportunity to see talented musicians early in their careers.”

The orchestra has performed with many distinguished guest conductors and soloists, including Neeme Järvi, Vadim Repin, Fabio Luisi, Peter Serkin, Gerard Schwarz, Tan Dun, Zuill Bailey, and JoAnn Falletta. In the 2019–20 season, conductors Leonard Slatkin and Hans Graf will also lead TŌN performances. Recordings featuring The Orchestra Now include Ferdinand Ries piano concertos with Piers Lane on Hyperion Records, and a Sorel Classics concert recording of pianist Anna Shelest performing works by Anton Rubinstein with TŌN and conductor Neeme Järvi. Upcoming albums include a second release with Piers Lane on Hyperion Records in the spring of 2020. Recordings of TŌN’s live concerts from the Fisher Center can be heard on Classical WMHT-FM and WWFM The Classical Network, and are featured regularly on Performance Today, broadcast nationwide. In 2019, the orchestra’s performance with Vadim Repin was live-streamed on The Violin Channel.

For upcoming activities and more detailed information about the musicians, visit theorchestranow.org.

Leon Botstein
Leon Botstein brings a renowned career as both a conductor and educator to his role as music director of The Orchestra Now. He has been music director of the American Symphony Orchestra since 1992, artistic co-director of Bard SummerScape and the Bard Music Festival since their creation, and president of Bard College since 1975. He was the music director of the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra from 2003–11 and is now conductor laureate. In 2018, he assumed artistic directorship of Campus Grafenegg and Grafenegg Academy in Austria. Mr. Botstein is also a frequent guest conductor with orchestras around the globe, has made numerous recordings, and is a prolific author and music historian. He is editor of the prestigious The Musical Quarterly and has received many honors for his contributions to music. More info online at LeonBotstein.com.

Press Contacts
Pascal Nadon
Pascal Nadon Communications
Phone: 646.234.7088
Email: pascal@pascalnadon.com

Mark Primoff
Associate Vice President of Communications
Bard College
Phone: 845.758.7412
Email: primoff@bard.edu

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