THE ORCHESTRA NOW (TŌN) ANNOUNCES 2019–20 PERFORMANCE SEASON SEPTEMBER 14, 2019 – MAY 17, 2020

TŌN’s Fifth Season Presents Concert Series at Carnegie Hall, Jazz at Lincoln Center, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Fisher Center at Bard, and Four Free Concerts in New York City and Beyond

World Premiere of Zhou Long’s Men of Iron and the Golden Spike; U.S. Premieres of Galina Ustvolskaya’s Symphonic Poem No. 1, César Franck’s What You Hear on the Mountain, Zhou Long’s Classic of Mountains and Seas, and Egon Wellesz’s Prospero’s Incantations; and NYC Premieres of Leonard Slatkin’s Kinah and Cindy McTee’s Double Play

Rare Performances of Honegger’s Rugby and Symphony No. 1, Mitropoulos’ Concerto Grosso, d’Indy’s Symphony on a French Mountain Air, and Vaughan Williams’ Symphony No. 7, Sinfonia Antartica

Guest Artists Include Conductors Tan Dun, Hans Graf, and Leonard Slatkin; Pianists Anna Polonsky and Blair McMillen; Violinist Xinran Li, Soprano Paulina Swierczek, and Baritone Michael Nagy

Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, August 21, 2019  — The Orchestra Now (TŌN), the visionary orchestra and master’s degree program founded by Bard College president, conductor, educator, and music historian Leon Botstein, begins its fifth season on September 14, 2019. Five different series and three special events will offer 19 diverse programs and 31 performances presenting novel combinations of both time-honored and lesser-known repertoire through May 17, 2020. Since the Orchestra’s launch in 2015, the young members of TŌN have performed 261 works by 137 composers for more than 50,000 people in 23 venues, with 158 soloists and 15 conductors.

“As we look forward to our 2019-20 season and reflect on all that has been accomplished since the Orchestra was founded only four years ago, I am so very proud that TŌN has firmly established its place in New York’s rich cultural landscape,” said Music Director Leon Botstein. “Its achievements have been earned by offering performances of the highest quality, filled with the energy and virtuosity of its young artists, who demonstrate their gifts and their exceptional skills at each performance. With such a bright present, the future is undeniably promising.”

Highlights of the 2019–20 season include the world premiere of Pulitzer Prize-winner Zhou Long’s Men of Iron and the Golden Spike, a piece inspired by the thousands of Chinese workers who helped complete the Transcontinental Railroad in the American West. There will also be four U.S. premieres: Galina Ustvolskaya’s 1948 Symphonic Poem No. 1, featured on the opening night program at the Fisher Center at Bard on September 14-15; César Franck’s What You Hear on the Mountain—likely the very first symphonic poem in history—at the Fisher Center at Bard on April 25–26 (with the NYC premiere following at Carnegie Hall on April 30); Egon Wellesz’s Prospero’s Incantations—stirred by the character in Shakespeare’s play The Tempest—under the baton of guest conductor Hans Graf at Bard on November 2-3; and Zhou Long’s new symphonic work inspired by ancient Chinese classic text, Classic of Mountains and Seas, at Carnegie Hall on October 1. Guest conductor and Grammy-winner Leonard Slatkin will lead TŌN in the NY City premieres of his Kinah, an elegy for his late parents, and Cindy McTee’s Double Play, a work dedicated to Slatkin by the composer, at Rose Theater on March 22.

Also notable are two Carnegie Hall programs offering the first NYC performances in over 50 years of Honegger’s Rugby and Mitropoulos’ Concerto Grosso (November 14); and Vincent d’Indy’s Symphony on a French Mountain Air alongside Vaughan Williams’ Sinfonia Antartica (April 30). A December 8 concert at The Metropolitan Museum of Art will mark the first NYC performance of Honegger’s Symphony No. 1 in 58 years.

The Fisher Center series at Bard College will offer programs ranging from an all-Beethoven concert in celebration of the 250th anniversary of the great master’s birth to the U.S. premiere of Galina Ustvolskaya’s Symphonic Poem No. 1. The distinguished Carnegie Hall series will include one program of works from the 1920s and an evening titled Into the Wilderness that includes the first symphonic poem ever composed. Rose Theater at Jazz at Lincoln Center will host a concert with Academy Award-winning guest conductor Tan Dun and a second performance featuring Detroit Symphony Orchestra Music Director Laureate Leonard Slatkin conducting Rachmaninoff in addition to two NYC premieres, including one of his own. The top-selling Sight & Sound series at The Metropolitan Museum of Art returns with three programs exploring the connections between music and artworks about technology, chivalry and modernism. Four FREE concerts will be offered in New York City and beyond, including two at Peter Norton Symphony Space in Manhattan led by TŌN’s resident conductor Zachary Schwartzman: one program presenting Ravel’s Boléro and Stravinsky’s Petrushka, and a second featuring works by Liszt, Kodály, and Bartók. The appealing programming of these free performances is a great opportunity for families to experience their first orchestral performance and attract future generations to the joys of classical music.

The 2019-20 season will offer three special events. At Carnegie Hall, From the Middle Kingdom to the Wild West will roll out new works by Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Zhou Long that evoke ancient and modern mythical geographies. The presentation is part of the 2019 China Now Music Festival and includes the world-premiere of Men of Iron and the Golden Spike, a work about the thousands of Chinese workers who helped complete the Transcontinental Railroad in the American West, and the U.S. premiere of Classic of Mountains and Seas, a new symphonic work inspired by the ancient Chinese classic text “Shan Hai Jing” (October 1). The program will also be performed at Stanford University’s Bing Concert Hall in Stanford, CA (October 6), and is presented by the US-China Music Institute of the Bard College Conservatory with the Center for East Asian Studies and the Chinese Railroad Worker’s Project at Stanford University. The US-China Music Institute will also present a special Chinese New Year concert featuring conductor Jindong Cai and soloists from the Central Conservatory of Music in China, at the Fisher Center at Bard (January 25) and at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Rose Theater (January 26). In addition, TŌN will collaborate with Bard’s Graduate Vocal Arts Program on an opera-to-be-announced under the baton of TŌN’s Associate Conductor James Bagwell at the Fisher Center at Bard (March 6 & 8).

This year marks the third season of TŌN’s successful broadcast series on WMHT-FM, the NPR classical music radio station of New York’s Capital Region, and the second season on WWFM – The Classical Network station serving New Jersey and eastern Pennsylvania, both featuring programs from the Fisher Center series. TŌN’s performance are also heard regularly on American Public Media’s Performance Today! This spring, TŌN’s second album with pianist Piers Lane will be released by Hyperion Records, featuring works by Sir Arthur Bliss, Edmund Rubbra, and Sir Arnold Bax.

TŌN welcomes a new class of 28 young musicians in 2019-20, for a total of 66 members in all. TŌN musicians hail from twelve countries around the world: Bulgaria, China, Hungary, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Mongolia, Peru, Taiwan, Ukraine, the U.K., as well as the U.S. TŌN musicians accepted into the curriculum take either a three-year Master of Music Degree Program in Curatorial, Critical, and Performance Studies, or a two-year Advanced Certificate in Orchestral Studies. Hundreds of candidates vie for the opportunity to rehearse, perform, and study with Bard College faculty, guest scholars, and performing artists, surrounded by the intellectual atmosphere of a liberal arts college uniquely suited to the task, at one of America’s most forward-thinking classical music centers.

CARNEGIE HALL SERIES, Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
The Orchestra Now returns to Carnegie Hall with Leon Botstein for a season that puts seldom-performed masterworks in the spotlight. The November program features rare New York City performances of four works, and in April, audiences can hear the NYC premiere of César Franck’s symphonic poem What You Hear on the Mountain, most likely the first symphonic poem ever written.

Stravinsky’s The Fairy’s Kiss
Thu, Nov 14, 2019 at 7 PM
These four works from the late 1920s give insight into the evolving world of orchestral music 90 years ago. The evening presents the suite from Stravinsky’s ballet score The Fairy’s Kiss, written as an homage to Tchaikovsky and based on Hans Christian Andersen’s short story Isjomfruen (The Ice-Maiden). Honegger’s Rugby is one of three movements from his third symphony expressing the horrors of war; the Swiss composer Othmar Schoeck adapted Gottfried Keller’s poem Lebendig Begraben for the song cycle Buried Alive to tell the story of a man who wakes up to find he has mistakenly been buried; and Mitropoulos’ 1929 Concerto Grosso—a Baroque musical format—was considered by the composer to be his best work.
Leon Botstein, conductor
Michael Nagy, baritone
Honegger: Rugby*
Schoeck: Buried Alive
Mitropoulos: Concerto Grosso*
Stravinsky: Divertimento, The Fairy’s Kiss Suite
*First NYC performances in over 50 years

Into the Wilderness
Thu, Apr 30, 2020 at 7 PM
This program offers a musical expedition that ventures Into the Wilderness. Vaughan Williams’ portrait of the mighty Antarctic drew its inspiration from music he composed for the film Scott of the Antarctic. The theme of d’Indy’s 1886 Symphony on a French Mountain Air was inspired by a folk song the composer heard at Périer overlooking the mountains, and was created as a fantasy for piano and orchestra. The works of César Franck, a prolific composer of operas, oratorios, symphonic poems, organ and chamber music, remain relatively unheard. This will be the NYC premiere of his beautiful What You Hear on the Mountain, which was written in 1947, before Liszt’s first symphonic poem of the same title, and may be the very first symphonic poem in history.
Leon Botstein, conductor
Blair McMillen, piano
Members of the Bard Festival Chorale
James Bagwell, choral director
Soprano Soloist TBA
César Franck: What You Hear on the Mountain (NYC Premiere)
Vincent d’Indy: Symphony on a French Mountain Air*
Vaughan Williams: Symphony No. 7, Sinfonia Antartica*
*First NYC performances in over 50 years

Tickets priced at $25–$60 are available online at carnegiehall.org, by calling CarnegieCharge at 212.247.7800, or at the Carnegie Hall box office at 57th & Seventh.

ROSE THEATER SERIES
The Orchestra Now presents two concerts in Rose Theater at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Frederick P. Rose Hall. Tan Dun, world-renowned composer, conductor, and Dean of the Bard College Conservatory of Music, will take the podium for the first concert (Dec 15, details TBA). Guest conductor Leonard Slatkin will lead a performance highlighted by two NYC premieres, including his own work, Kinah.

Slatkin Conducts Rachmaninoff
Sun, Mar 22, 2020 at 3 PM

Grammy-winner Leonard Slatkin, Music Director Laureate of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, conducts the NYC premiere of an elegy to his late parents, along with Rachmaninoff’s hauntingly beautiful second symphony, dedicated to Russian composer Sergei Taneyev. McTee’s Double Play was dedicated to Slatkin and commissioned by the Detroit Symphony, which premiered the work in 2011.
Leonard Slatkin, conductor
Cindy McTee: Double Play (NYC Premiere)
Leonard Slatkin: Kinah (NYC Premiere)
Rachmaninoff: Symphony No. 2

Tickets priced at $25–$50 are available online at jazz.org, by calling CenterCharge at 212.721.6500, or at the Jazz at Lincoln Center box office at Broadway & 60th, Ground Floor.

SIGHT & SOUND SERIES AT THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART
The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Conductor and music historian Leon Botstein explores the parallels between orchestral music and the visual arts in TŌN’s popular Sight & Sound series at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. This season the series will present three programs from October 27, 2019 through February 23, 2020. Each presentation offers a discussion accompanied by musical excerpts performed by The Orchestra Now with on-screen artworks, followed by a full performance and audience Q&A.

Strauss’ Don Quixote & The Last Knight
Sun, Oct 27, 2019 at 2 PM
Emperor Maximilian I of Austria, often referred to as “the last knight,” was passionate about the exploration of chivalry and armor. There is no more influential tale of knighthood than Cervantes’ Don Quixote, which inspired Strauss’ “Fantastic Variations on a Theme of Knightly Character,” the composer’s moving musical realization of Quixote’s chivalric journey.
Leon Botstein, conductor
Lucas Button, cello
Leonardo Vásquez Chacón, viola
Strauss: Don Quixote
Artwork about Chivalry

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition The Last Knight: The Art, Armor, and Ambition of Maximillian I, on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art October 7, 2019–January 5, 2020

Honegger, Vallotton & the Avant-Garde in Paris
Sun, Dec 8, 2019 at 2 PM
Composer Arthur Honegger and painter Félix Vallotton were both Swiss nationals who spent the larger part of their careers in Paris, where they became part of the avant-garde scene in music (Le Six) and art (Les Nabis). Both explored the intersection of tradition and modernism. Honegger’s first symphony mirrors the magnetism of Paris in the 1920s.
Leon Botstein, conductor
Honegger: Symphony No. 1*
The Artwork of Félix Vallotton
*First NYC performance in 58 years

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Félix Vallotton: Painter of Disquiet, on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art October 29, 2019–January 26, 2020

Haydn’s The Clock: The Intersection of Art & Technology
Sun, Feb 23, 2020 2 PM
Musicians, like their contemporaries in art and science, were mesmerized (often literally by Franz Anton Mesmer himself) by advancements and pseudo-advancements in science and technology during the second half of the 18th century. While Mozart poked fun at this fascination in Così fan tutte, Haydn drew inspiration from the advances in horology in Vienna and London.
Leon Botstein, conductor
Haydn: Symphony No. 101, The Clock
Artwork about Technology

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Making Marvels: Science and Splendor at the Courts of Europe, on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art November 25, 2019–March 1, 2020

Tickets priced at $30–$50; 3-concert series from $75; Bring the Kids for $1. All tickets include same-day museum admission. Tickets may be purchased online at metmuseum.org/sightandsound, by calling The Met at 212.570.3949, or at The Great Hall box office at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

THE FISHER CENTER SERIES AT BARD, Sosnoff Theater
The Orchestra Now’s residency at Bard College’s Fisher Center renews with 13 performances of seven different programs, all conducted by music director Leon Botstein. Opening night features the U.S. premiere of Ustvolskaya’s 1948 work Symphonic Poem No. 1, originally titled The Light of the Steppes; and Strauss’ Four Songs with Canadian soprano Paulina Swierczek, a winner of Bard Conservatory’s concerto competition.

Copland & Strauss  
Sat, Sep 14, 2019 at 8 PM
Sun, Sep 15, 2019 at 2 PM
The Fisher Center season opens with Copland’s “Great American Symphony” along with a romantic set of songs that Strauss gave to his wife on their wedding day.
Leon Botstein, conductor
Paulina Swierczek, soprano
Galina Ustvolskaya: Symphonic Poem No. 1 (U.S. Premiere)
Strauss: Four Songs, Op. 27
Copland: Symphony No. 3

Sibelius & Shostakovich
Sat, Oct 19, 2019 at 8 PM
Sun, Oct 20, 2019 at 2 PM
Xinran Li, a winner of Bard Conservatory’s concerto competition, performs Sibelius’ moving violin concerto. Shostakovich’s tenth symphony is his first written after the death of Stalin.
Leon Botstein, conductor
Xinran Li, violin
Sibelius: Violin Concerto
Shostakovich: Symphony No. 10

Hans Graf Conducts Schubert
Sat, Nov 2, 2019 at 8 PM
Sun, Nov 3, 2019 at 2 PM
Austrian conductor Hans Graf leads TŌN in two pieces from his homeland: Schubert’s beloved Great Symphony, and a set of tone poems based on characters from The Tempest.
Hans Graf, conductor
Egon Wellesz: Prospero’s Incantations (U.S. Premiere)
Franz Schubert: Symphony No. 9, The Great

Stravinsky’s The Fairy’s Kiss
Wed, Nov 13, 2019 at 7 PM
These four works from the late 1920s, including the suite from Stravinsky’s ballet score The Fairy’s Kiss, give insight into the evolving world of orchestral music 90 years ago. This concert will be repeated at Carnegie Hall on November 14.
Leon Botstein, conductor
Michael Nagy, baritone
Honegger: Rugby*
Schoeck: Buried Alive
Mitropoulos: Concerto Grosso*
Stravinsky: Divertimento, The Fairy’s Kiss Suite
*First NY performances in over 50 years

Beethoven’s Eroica
Sat, Feb 8, 2020 at 8 PM
Sun, Feb 9, 2020 at 2 PM
The 250th anniversary of the birth of one of the greatest composers of all time is celebrated with a performance of Beethoven’s heroic third symphony.
Leon Botstein, conductor
Anna Polonsky, piano
Beethoven:
The Consecration of the House Overture
Piano Concerto No. 4
Symphony No. 3, Eroica

Into the Wilderness
Sat, Apr 25, 2020 at 8 PM
Sun, Apr 26, 2020 at 2 PM
A musical expedition featuring Vaughan Williams’ portrait of the mighty Antarctic and two French mountain treks, including the U.S. premiere of the first symphonic poem ever composed. This concert will be repeated at Carnegie Hall on April 30.
Leon Botstein, conductor
Blair McMillen, piano
Members of the Bard Festival Chorale
James Bagwell, choral director
Soprano Soloist TBA
Franck: What You Hear on the Mountain (U.S. Premiere)
d’Indy: Symphony on a French Mountain Air*
Vaughan Williams: Symphony No. 7, Sinfonia Antartica*
*First NY performances in over 50 years

Mahler’s Resurrection Symphony
Sat, May 9, 2020 at 8 PM
Sun, May 10, 2020 at 2 PM
The Orchestra Now and the Bard College Conservatory Orchestra join forces with the Bard College Chamber Singers and Bard Festival Chorale for a performance of Mahler’s massive composition about the beauty of the afterlife, one of his most popular works.
Leon Botstein, conductor
Bard Conservatory Orchestra
Bard College Chamber Singers
Bard Festival Chorale
James Bagwell, choral director
Soloists from Bard’s Graduate Vocal Arts Program TBA
Mahler: Symphony No. 2, Resurrection
A co-presentation with the Bard College Conservatory of Music

Tickets priced at $25–$35; Five-Concert Series: all locations $120; Create Your Own Series: 25% off the full price. Tickets may be purchased online at fishercenter.bard.edu, by calling the Fisher Center at 845.758.7900, or at the Fisher Center box office in the lobby of Sosnoff Theater.

FREE CONCERTS SERIES

TŌN continues its series of free concerts at venues in New York City and beyond, providing families with an opportunity to attend their first orchestral performance and introduce a new generation to classical music. TŌN’s performances this season will include four performances of audience favorites ranging from Mozart and Mendelssohn to Ravel and Debussy with TŌN conductors Zachary Schwartzman and James Bagwell.

Ravel, Mozart & Midsummer
Sun, Nov 24, 2019 at 3 PM
Hudson Hall, Hudson, NY

Zachary Schwartzman, conductor
Mendelssohn: Selections from A Midsummer Night’s Dream
Ravel: Le tombeau de Couperin
Mozart: Symphony No. 39

Boléro & Petrushka
Sun, Feb 16, 2020 at 4 PM
Peter Norton Symphony Space, NYC

Zachary Schwartzman, conductor
Debussy: Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun
Messiaen: The Forgotten Offerings
Ravel: Boléro
Stravinsky: Petrushka (1947)

Mozart, Bach & Mendelssohn
Sun, Mar 29, 2020 at 3 PM
Hudson Hall, Hudson, NY

James Bagwell, conductor
Bard Festival Chorale
Soloists from Bard’s Graduate Vocal Arts Program TBA
Mozart: Regina Coeli, K. 276
Bach: Magnificat
Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 3, Scottish

Liszt & Bartók
Sun, May 17, 2020 at 4 PM
Peter Norton Symphony Space, NYC
Zachary Schwartzman, conductor
Liszt: Les préludes
Kodály: Dances of Galánta
Bartók: Music for Strings, Percussion, and Celeste

Tickets: These concerts are FREE, no tickets necessary, advance RSVP suggested. For concerts at Symphony Space, RSVP at symphonyspace.org. For concerts at Hudson Hall, RSVP at hudsonhall.org.

SPECIAL EVENTS
Special events during the 2019-20 season include From the Middle Kingdom to the Wild West, a Carnegie Hall program presenting both a world and a U.S. premiere of works by Chinese-American composer Zhou Long (Oct. 1); a Chinese New Year concert with Associate Conductor Jindong Cai at the Fisher Center at Bard and at Rose Theater at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Frederick P. Rose Hall (Jan. 25 and 26); and an opera led by TŌN Associate Conductor James Bagwell at the Fisher Center at Bard (Mar. 6 and 8).

From the Middle Kingdom to the Wild West
Part of the 2019 China Now Music Festival
This program will offer new works by Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Zhou Long, evoking ancient and modern mythical geographies. The concert includes the world premiere of his Men of Iron and the Golden Spike, a piece inspired by the thousands of Chinese workers who helped complete the Transcontinental Railroad in the American West. In addition, TŌN will perform the U.S. premiere of Long’s Classic of Mountains and Seas, which combines ancient Chinese traditions with modern Western technique. TŌN Associate Conductor Jindong Cai, a three-time recipient of the ASCAP Award for Adventurous Programming of Contemporary Music, will lead the Orchestra along with the China Now Festival Chorus.

The program comprises an open dress rehearsal at the Fisher Center at Bard (Sept. 29), a Carnegie Hall concert on October 1, and a performance at Stanford University in California on October 6. From the Middle Kingdom to the Wild West is presented by the US-China Music Institute of the Bard College Conservatory with the Center for East Asian Studies and the Chinese Railroad Worker’ s Project at Stanford University.

Jindong Cai, conductor
China Now Festival Chorus
Zhou Long:
Men of Iron and the Golden Spike (World Premiere)
Classic of Mountains and Seas (U.S. Premiere)

Open Dress Rehearsal
Sun, Sep 29, 2019 at 3 PM
The Fisher Center at Bard
Sosnoff Theater, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY
Free admission. No tickets necessary.

Tue, Oct 1, 2019 at 7:30 PM
Carnegie Hall, Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage

Tickets priced at $25–$60 are available online at carnegiehall.org, by calling CarnegieCharge at 212.247.7800, or the Carnegie Hall box office at 57th & Seventh.

Sun, Oct 6, 2019 at 2:30 PM
Bing Concert Hall at Stanford University, Stanford, CA
Tickets priced at $32–$84 are available online at live.stanford.edu, by calling 650.724.BING (2464), or at the Bing Concert Hall ticket office at 327 Lasuen St. in Stanford, CA.

Chinese New Year Concert
Presented by the US-China Music Institute of the Bard College Conservatory
Jindong Cai, conductor
Soloists from the Central Conservatory of Music, China
Full repertoire to be announced.

Sat, Jan 25, 2020 at 7 PM
The Fisher Center at Bard
Sosnoff Theater, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY

Tickets will be available in December at fishercenter.bard.edu, by calling the Fisher Center at 845.758.7900, or at the Fisher Center box office in the lobby of Sosnoff Theater.

Sun, Jan 26, 2020 at 3 PM
Rose Theater at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Frederick P. Rose Hall
Time Warner Center, NYC
Tickets will be available in December at jazz.org, by calling CenterCharge at 212.721.6500, or at the Jazz at Lincoln Center box office at Broadway & 60th, Ground Floor.

OPERA TO BE ANNOUNCED
Fri, Mar 6, 2020 at 8 PM

Sun, Mar 8, 2020 at 2 PM
The Fisher Center at Bard, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY
Presented by the Graduate Vocal Arts Program of the Bard College Conservatory
James Bagwell, conductor

Tickets will be available online at fishercenter.bard.edu, by calling 845.758.7900, or at the Fisher Center box office in the lobby of Sosnoff Theater.

The Orchestra Now
The Orchestra Now (TŌN) is a group of 66 vibrant young musicians from 12 different countries across the globe: Bulgaria, China, Hungary, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Mongolia, Peru, Taiwan, Ukraine, the U.K., and the U.S. All share a mission to make orchestral music relevant to 21st-century audiences by sharing their unique personal insights in a welcoming environment. Hand-picked from the world’s leading conservatories—including The Juilliard School, Shanghai Conservatory of Music, Royal Conservatory of Brussels, and the Curtis Institute of Music—the members of TŌN are enlightening curious minds by giving on-stage introductions and demonstrations, writing concert notes from the musicians’ perspective, and having one-on-one discussions with patrons during intermissions.

Conductor, educator, and music historian Leon Botstein, whom The New York Times said “draws rich, expressive playing from the orchestra, founded TŌN in 2015 as a graduate program at Bard College, where he is also president. TŌN offers both a three-year master’s degree in Curatorial, Critical, and Performance Studies and a two-year advanced certificate in Orchestra Studies. The orchestra’s home base is the Frank Gehry-designed Fisher Center at Bard, where they perform multiple concerts each season and take part in the annual Bard Music Festival. They also perform regularly at the finest venues in New York, including Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and others across NYC and beyond. HuffPost, who has called TŌN’s performances “dramatic and intense,” praises these concerts as “an opportunity to see talented musicians early in their careers.”

The orchestra has performed with many distinguished guest conductors and soloists, including Neeme Järvi, Vadim Repin, Fabio Luisi, Peter Serkin, Gerard Schwarz, Tan Dun, Zuill Bailey, and JoAnn Falletta. In the 2019–20 season, conductors Leonard Slatkin and Hans Graf will also lead TŌN performances. Recordings featuring The Orchestra Now include Ferdinand Ries piano concertos with Piers Lane on Hyperion Records, and a Sorel Classics concert recording of pianist Anna Shelest performing works by Anton Rubinstein with TŌN and conductor Neeme Järvi. Upcoming albums include a second release with Piers Lane on Hyperion Records in the spring of 2020. Recordings of TŌN’s live concerts from the Fisher Center can be heard on Classical WMHT-FM and WWFM The Classical Network, and are featured regularly on Performance Today, broadcast nationwide. In 2019, the orchestra’s performance with Vadim Repin was live-streamed on The Violin Channel.

For upcoming activities and more detailed information about the musicians, visit theorchestranow.org.

Leon Botstein
Leon Botstein brings a renowned career as both a conductor and educator to his role as music director of The Orchestra Now. He has been music director of the American Symphony Orchestra since 1992, artistic co-director of Bard SummerScape and the Bard Music Festival since their creation, and president of Bard College since 1975. He was the music director of the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra from 2003–11 and is now conductor laureate. In 2018, he assumed artistic directorship of Campus Grafenegg and Grafenegg Academy in Austria. Mr. Botstein is also a frequent guest conductor with orchestras around the globe, has made numerous recordings, and is a prolific author and music historian. He is editor of the prestigious The Musical Quarterly and has received many honors for his contributions to music. More info online at LeonBotstein.com.

Press Contacts
Pascal Nadon
Pascal Nadon Communications
Phone: 646.234.7088
Email: pascal@pascalnadon.com

Mark Primoff
Associate Vice President of Communications
Bard College
Phone: 845.758.7412
Email: primoff@bard.edu

The New York Times: Abstraction in Music and Art

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“On Sunday, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Leon Botstein led The Orchestra Now in a program called “Abstraction in Music and Art,” tied to one of the Met’s current exhibitions. With just about 45 minutes of playing, this was more of a lecture than it was a traditional orchestral concert. But the stretches of commentary and the performances both had their moments.

Mr. Botstein delivered some learned, witty remarks (complete with slide show) on the aesthetic ties between Anton Webern, Morton Feldman and the visual art scenes of their respective eras. Webern’s “Six Pieces for Orchestra” was played sensitively, twice, both before and after the intermission.

Yet the real star of the show was the belated New York premiere of Feldman’s “Orchestra”: a nearly 20-minute work of drifting sublimity that predates the composer’s “Neither,” a one-act opera with a text by Samuel Beckett.

Mr. Botstein and the players did justice to the strangeness of “Orchestra.” A meditative mood prevailed through whisper-quiet passages and more formidable, massed ones. And the strings brought a sneaky sense of unease to the haunting melodic line that reappears throughout the work’s final minutes.” – Seth Colter Walls

Photo by David DeNee

Vulture: It’s Time We All Heard the Music of Lili Boulanger

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“Boulanger matured early and worked feverishly, and in the time allotted her, produced a handful of masterworks that require no special pleading. They weren’t lost, hidden, or unplayable; they were just treated with a neglect that would be shocking if it weren’t so predictable. The New York Philharmonic hasn’t performed a note of hers in more than 40 years. The last concert of her works on Carnegie Hall’s main stage took place in 1962. Fortunately, this is just the sort of historical injustice that the conductor Leon Botstein loves to rectify, and on May 2, he leads The Orchestra Now in “De Profundis,” a Carnegie Hall concert of works based on Psalm 130. The program concludes with Boulanger’s massive, thrillingly dark setting of the text, which moves from despair (“Out of the depths have I cried unto thee, O Lord . . .”) to tremulous hope. Those were the two emotional poles of her life.” —Justin Davidson

THE ORCHESTRA NOW (TŌN) PRESENTS ABSTRACTION IN MUSIC & ART AT THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART ON MAY 19, 2019

NEW YORK PREMIERE OF MORTON FELDMAN’S ORCHESTRA FEATURED

Concert Presented in Conjunction with
The Met Museum’s Exhibition Epic Abstraction: Pollock to Herrera

New York, NY, April 29, 2019 — The Orchestra Now (TŌN) will perform the final performance this season of its frequently sold-out Sight & Sound series at The Metropolitan Museum of Art on Sunday, May 19 at 2 pm. The concert features the New York premiere of one of Morton Feldman’s lesser-known early works, Orchestra, along with Anton Webern’s Six Pieces for Orchestra, in a program titled Abstraction in Music & Art.

Painters have often been inspired by music as the ultimate abstract art form. One of the early abstract painters, Kandinsky, was so moved by music that he attempted to compose himself. Musical abstraction started with the radical modernist Anton Webern, who freed the form from the conventions of late Romanticism. At the height of the movement’s popularity in America, experimental composer Morton Feldman mirrored Kandinsky and took his inspiration from abstract visual art. The May 19 program will be offered in conjunction with Epic Abstraction: Pollock to Herrera, an exhibition of Abstract Expressionistic artwork at The Met Fifth Avenue.

TŌN conductor and music historian Leon Botstein will explore the parallels between orchestral music and the visual arts in a discussion accompanied by on-screen artworks and musical excerpts performed by the Orchestra. A full performance and audience Q&A will follow.

SIGHT & SOUND SERIES AT THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART
The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Abstraction in Music & Art
Sunday May 19, 2019 at 2 pm
Webern’s Six Pieces for Orchestra, Feldman’s Orchestra (NY Premiere), and the artwork of the Abstract Expressionists

Tickets start at $30, bring the kids for $1. Tickets are available online at metmuseum.org/sightandsound, by calling The Met at 212.570.3949, or in person at The Great Hall Box Office at The Metropolitan Museum of Art at 5th Ave and 82nd St.

The Orchestra Now
The Orchestra Now (TŌN) is a group of 60 vibrant young musicians from 13 different countries around the globe: the United States, Bulgaria, China, France, Hungary, Korea, Malaysia, Mongolia, Peru, Spain, Ukraine, the United Kingdom, and Venezuela. All share a mission to make orchestral music relevant to 21st-century audiences. Hand-picked from hundreds of applicants from the world’s leading conservatories—including The Juilliard School, Shanghai Conservatory of Music, Royal Conservatory of Brussels, and the Curtis Institute of Music—the members of TŌN are not only rousing audiences with their critically acclaimed performances, but also enlightening curious minds by presenting on-stage introductions and demonstrations at concerts, offering program notes written from the musicians’ perspective, and connecting with patrons through one-on-one discussions during intermissions. To date, members of TŌN have earned positions with orchestras across the United States and in Europe. Some play regularly with the New York Philharmonic, Philadelphia Orchestra, and the Baltimore Symphony.

Conductor, educator, and music historian Leon Botstein founded TŌN in 2015 as a master’s degree program at Bard College, where he also serves as president. The Orchestra is in residence at Bard’s Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts, offering multiple concerts there each season as well as participating in the annual Bard Music Festival. The Orchestra also performs numerous concert series at major venues in New York, including Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, and The Metropolitan Museum of Art, as well as a schedule of free performances across New York City boroughs. TŌN has collaborated with many distinguished conductors, including Fabio Luisi, Neeme Järvi, Gerard Schwarz, and JoAnn Falletta.

For upcoming activities and more detailed information about the musicians, visit theorchestranow.org.

Leon Botstein
Leon Botstein brings a renowned career as both a conductor and educator to his role as music director of The Orchestra Now. He has been music director of the American Symphony Orchestra since 1992, artistic co-director of Bard SummerScape and the Bard Music Festival since their creation, and president of Bard College since 1975. He was the music director of the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra from 2003–2011 and is now conductor laureate. In 2018, he assumed artistic directorship of Campus Grafenegg and Grafenegg Academy in Austria. Mr. Botstein is also a frequent guest conductor with orchestras around the globe, has made numerous recordings, and is a prolific author and music historian. He is the editor of the prestigious The Musical Quarterly and has received many honors for his contributions to music. More info online at LeonBotstein.com.

Press Contacts
Pascal Nadon
Pascal Nadon Communications
Phone: 646.234.7088
Email: pascal@pascalnadon.com

Mark Primoff
Associate Vice President of Communications
Bard College
Phone: 845.758.7412
Email: primoff@bard.edu

# # #

OperaWire: An Immaculate Presentation of Verdi’s Requiem

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“Having heard the work a number of times (as well as having so many recordings in my head), this clearly was one of  the most memorable and moving Verdi Requiems I have heard.

Conductor Botstein consistently demonstrated an ability to bring the massive forces together, with a precision that had the array of forces cohere with great, controlled power. And, as usual for Botstein, he brought out details and shadings in the work that, well, seemed entirely new.

And with a graduate student orchestra, that youth and exuberance meant that – with all that detail and attention in place – the performance was, at many times, earthshakingly exciting. The “Tuba Mirum,” with trumpets placed in the upper balcony, produced a tidal wave of sound, and yet always remained musical, always controlled, as if that hurricane rattling outside your front door could be controlled.

As to “Requiem’s” quieter moments, the shading that Botstein elicited from the orchestra, the chorus and the soloists — in sections like the “Liber scriptus” or the “Ingemisco” — brought both a clear beauty of sound and a solemn peace amidst the Requiem’s stormy moments, always with fierce “judgement,” of course pending.

And when the audience – and I do not exaggerate here — shot to their feet as one, we perhaps all well knew there might not have been a better place to hear this great music, performed at this level of excellence, on this day just about anywhere.” —Matt Costello

Photo by Matt Dine

TŌN BEGINS SPRING SEASON AT JAZZ AT LINCOLN CENTER’S ROSE THEATER WITH CONDUCTOR FABIO LUISI MARCH 26, 2019

Performances Continue at Carnegie Hall and The Metropolitan Museum of Art Featuring the Premieres of Joachim Raff’s Psalm 130: De Profundis and Lera Auerbach’s De Profundis, and the NY Premiere of Morton Feldman’s Orchestra

Guests Include Violinist Vadim Repin, Soprano Elizabeth de Trejo, & Pianist Alessandro Taverna

Plus Concerts at The Fisher Center at Bard College and a Free Concert at Hudson Hall

New York, NY, March 7, 2019 — The Orchestra Now (TŌN) begins its spring season at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Frederick P. Rose Hall on Tuesday, March 26 at 7:30 pm. The concert will present works by Brahms and Grieg with pianist Alessandro Taverna led by distinguished guest conductor Fabio Luisi, music director of the Zurich Opera and principal conductor of the Danish National Symphony Orchestra. The season continues through May 19, 2019.

Highlights include the second performance of the 2018-19 season at Carnegie Hall, marked by the New York City premieres of Joachim Raff’s Psalm 130: De Profundis and Lera Auerbach’s De Profundis—performed by world-renowned violinist Vadim Repin—in a program offering settings of Psalm 130 by four different composers, on May 2 (the U.S. premieres of these works will be performed in April at Bard College’s Fisher Center). And at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, TŌN will give the New York premiere of Morton Feldman’s lesser-known early orchestral work, Orchestra, on May 19.

Additional details for TŌN’s spring performances are included below.

ROSE THEATER SERIES
In addition to acclaimed guest conductor Fabio Luisi, the concluding concert in this season’s Rose Theater series features award-winning Italian pianist Alessandro Taverna, whose artistic life was the subject of a documentary shown on BBC-4 TV.

Fabio Luisi Conducts Brahms’ Second Symphony
Tuesday March 26, 2019 at 7:30 pm
Fabio Luisi, conductor
Alessandro Taverna, piano
Grieg: Piano Concerto
Brahms: Symphony No. 2

Tickets starting at $25 may be purchased online at jazz.org, by calling CenterCharge at 212.721.6500, or in person at the Jazz at Lincoln Center box office on the ground floor of the Time Warner Center, Broadway at 60th Street.

CARNEGIE HALL SERIES, Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
The final concert in TŌN’s Carnegie Hall season showcases the New York City premieres of Joachim Raff’s Psalm 130: De Profundis and Lera Auerbach’s De Profundis (Violin Concerto No. 3) with internationally acclaimed violinist Vadim Repin, as well as EMI recording artist, soprano Elizabeth de Trejo.

This exploration of Psalm 130—which reads “Out of the depths, Oh Lord, have I cried unto Thee”—features works by two women composers, Lera Auerbach and Lili Boulanger. Russian-born poet and composer Lera Auerbach’s version was originally commissioned by the Trans-Siberian Art Festival for founder and artistic director Vadim Repin, who performs its American premiere at this concert. Lili Boulanger’s rendering, performed with soprano Elizabeth de Trejo, reveals a sophisticated toolkit of compositional skills for such a young artist. Composed at the early age of 22, the piece is dedicated to the memory of Boulanger’s father. Her tragic life was cut short only a year later.

Also on the program are an a cappella choral interpretation of De Profundis by Pulitzer Prize-winning American composer Virgil Thomson, written in 1921 while he was still a student at Harvard, and Joachim Raff’s rarely-heard masterpiece, which was written for soprano, eight-part choir, and orchestra. Dedicated to Franz Liszt, it is often viewed as a reconciliation offering to the famous pianist/composer, with whom Raff had a sometimes-contentious relationship.

De Profundis: Out of the Depths
Thursday May 2, 2019 at 7 pm
Leon Botstein, conductor
Vadim Repin, violin
Elizabeth de Trejo, soprano
Bard Festival Chorale
James Bagwell, choral director
A co-presentation with the Trans-Siberian Art Festival
Virgil Thomson: De Profundis
Joachim Raff: Psalm 130: De Profundis (NYC Premiere*)
Lera Auerbach: De Profundis (Violin Concerto No. 3) (NYC Premiere*)
Lili Boulanger: Psalm 130: Du fond de l’abîme (De Profundis)

*U.S. Premieres will be performed on April 27 at Bard College’s Fisher Center.

Tickets, starting at $25, may be purchased online at carnegiehall.org, by calling CarnegieCharge at 212.247.7800, or in person at the Carnegie Hall box office at 57th and Seventh.

SIGHT & SOUND SERIES AT THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART
The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
The final performance this season of TŌN’s frequently sold-out Sight & Sound series at The Metropolitan Museum of Art features the New York premiere of Feldman’s Orchestra in a program titled Abstraction in Music & Art. TŌN, together with conductor and music historian Leon Botstein, will explore the parallels between orchestral music and the visual arts in a discussion accompanied by on-screen artworks and musical excerpts performed by the Orchestra. A full performance and audience Q&A follows.

Painters have often been inspired by music as the ultimate abstract art form. One of the early abstract painters, Kandinsky, was so moved by music that he attempted to compose himself. Musical abstraction started with the radical modernist Anton Webern, who freed the form from the conventions of late Romanticism. At the height of the movement’s popularity in America, experimental composer Morton Feldman mirrored Kandinsky and took his inspiration from abstract visual art. One of his lesser-known early orchestral works, Orchestra, receives its New York premiere at this performance.

The concert is presented in conjunction with the exhibition Epic Abstraction: Pollock to Herrera, on view at The Met Breuer.

Abstraction in Music & Art
Sunday May 19, 2019 at 2 pm
Webern’s Six Pieces for Orchestra, Feldman’s Orchestra (NY Premiere), and the artwork of the Abstract Expressionists

Tickets start at $30, bring the kids for $1. Tickets are available online at metmuseum.org/sightandsound, by calling The Met at 212.570.3949, or in person at The Great Hall Box Office at The Metropolitan Museum of Art at 5th Ave and 82nd St.

THE FISHER CENTER SERIES AT BARD COLLEGE, Sosnoff Theater
The Orchestra Now’s residency at Bard College’s Fisher Center completes the 2018-19 season with two programs led by music director Leon Botstein. The first concert offers a performance of Verdi’s much-loved Requiem with members of the Bard Conservatory Orchestra, the Bard College Chamber Singers, and the Bard Festival Chorale (April 6-7). The second program—De Profundis: Out of the Depths—is highlighted by the U.S. premieres of works by Joachim Raff and Lera Auerbach, with renowned violinist Vadim Repin and soprano Elizabeth de Trejo (April 27-28). See the Carnegie Hall May 2 listing for more information on this program.

Verdi’s Requiem
Saturday April 6, 2019 at 8 pm
Sunday April 7, 2019 at 2 pm
Leon Botstein, conductor
Margaret Tigue, soprano
Chloë Schaaf, mezzo-soprano
Wei Wu, bass
Verdi: Requiem
Members of the Bard Conservatory Orchestra, the Bard College Chamber Singers, and the Bard Festival Chorale
James Bagwell, choral director

De Profundis: Out of the Depths
Saturday April 27, 2019 at 8 pm
Sunday April 28, 2019 at 2 pm
Leon Botstein, conductor
Vadim Repin, violin
Elizabeth de Trejo, soprano
Bard Festival Chorale
James Bagwell, choral director
A co-presentation with the Trans-Siberian Art Festival
Virgil Thomson: De Profundis
Joachim Raff: Psalm 130: De Profundis (U.S. Premiere)
Lera Auerbach: De Profundis (Violin Concerto No. 3) (U.S. Premiere)
Lili Boulanger: Psalm 130: Du fond de l’abîme (De Profundis)

This concert will be repeated at Carnegie Hall on May 2.

Tickets from $25. Tickets may be purchased online at fishercenter.bard.edu, by calling the box office at 845.758.7900, or in person at the Fisher Center box office in the lobby of Sosnoff Theater.

FREE CONCERTS SERIES
The final performances this season in TŌN’s series of free concerts at multiple venues in New York City and the Hudson Valley will feature Schubert’s Fifth Symphony led by TŌN’s associate conductor, James Bagwell, and Beethoven’s Seventh Symphony led by TŌN’s resident conductor, Zachary Schwartzman. These popular concerts provide families with an opportunity to attend their first orchestral performance and expose a new generation to classical music.

Beethoven’s Seventh Symphony
Saturday April 13, 2019 at 2 pm at Olin Hall at Bard College
Zachary Schwartzman, conductor
Todd Crow, piano
Louis Spohr: Overture, Op. 12
Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 25
Beethoven: Symphony No. 7

Schubert’s Fifth Symphony
Sunday April 14, 2019 at 3 pm at Hudson Hall
James Bagwell, conductor
Mozart: The Abduction from the Seraglio Overture
Juan Crisóstomo de Arriaga: Symphony in D
Schubert: Symphony No. 5

Tickets: These concerts are FREE. For concerts at Hudson Hall, RSVPs can be made at hudsonhall.org, or by calling 518.822.1438. For concerts at Olin Hall, no RSVP or tickets are necessary.

The Orchestra Now
The Orchestra Now (TŌN) is a group of over 60 vibrant young musicians from 15 different countries around the globe: the United States, Bulgaria, China, France, Hungary, Korea, Malaysia, Mongolia, Peru, Poland, Spain, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, Ukraine, and Venezuela. All share a mission to make orchestral music relevant to 21st-century audiences. Hand-picked from hundreds of applicants from the world’s leading conservatories—including The Juilliard School, Shanghai Conservatory of Music, Royal Conservatory of Brussels, and the Curtis Institute of Music—the members of TŌN are not only rousing audiences with their critically acclaimed performances, but also enlightening curious minds by presenting on-stage introductions and demonstrations at concerts, offering program notes written from the musicians’ perspective, and connecting with patrons through one-on-one discussions during intermissions. To date, members of TŌN have earned positions with orchestras across the United States and in Europe. Some play regularly with the New York Philharmonic, Philadelphia Orchestra, and the Baltimore Symphony.

Conductor, educator, and music historian Leon Botstein founded TŌN in 2015 as a master’s degree program at Bard College, where he also serves as president. The Orchestra is in residence at Bard’s Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts, offering multiple concerts there each season as well as participating in the annual Bard Music Festival. The Orchestra also performs numerous concert series at major venues in New York, including Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, and The Metropolitan Museum of Art, as well as a schedule of free performances across New York City boroughs. TŌN has collaborated with many distinguished conductors, including Fabio Luisi, Neeme Järvi, Gerard Schwarz, and JoAnn Falletta.

For upcoming activities and more detailed information about the musicians, visit theorchestranow.org.

Leon Botstein
Leon Botstein brings a renowned career as both a conductor and educator to his role as music director of The Orchestra Now. He has been music director of the American Symphony Orchestra since 1992, artistic co-director of Bard SummerScape and the Bard Music Festival since their creation, and president of Bard College since 1975. He was the music director of the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra from 2003–2011 and is now conductor laureate. In 2018, he assumed artistic directorship of Campus Grafenegg and Grafenegg Academy in Austria. Mr. Botstein is also a frequent guest conductor with orchestras around the globe, has made numerous recordings, and is a prolific author and music historian. He is the editor of the prestigious The Musical Quarterly and has received many honors for his contributions to music. More info online at LeonBotstein.com.

Press Contacts
Pascal Nadon
Pascal Nadon Communications
Phone: 646.234.7088
Email: pascal@pascalnadon.com

Mark Primoff
Associate Vice President of Communications
Bard College
Phone: 845.758.7412
Email: primoff@bard.edu

# # #

The Millbrook Independent: TŌN at Bard Sizzles the Program

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“The Orchestra Now under the baton of Leon Botstein delivered a program music on The Romantic Hero last Saturday night at Bard’s Sosnoff Theater. All three works of the evening were introduced by students who had clear diction, knew how to use a microphone, and were adept at giving informal information with witty twist.

Kyle Anderson on cello was magnificent in the opening notes [of Tchaikovsky’s Francesca da Rimini] and throughout this symphonic poem. Flutes and strings conjured up heated winds that separated the longing lovers with Otherworldly intensity. The clarinets and bassoon worked overtime. And those delightful horns from hell!

The main course was Ein Heldenleben (A Hero’s Life, 1898), composed immediately after Don Quixote. Strauss’ wife is personified in first violin played by Concertmaster Sophia Bernitz, who gave an adept performance in the nearly six-minute solo that argued in enigmatic bird-like fashion with the orchestra to light comic effect, finally excelling in virtuosity with deep emotional lyricism at the pathos and resignation of the finale.

The blustery blare of the war passage is often condemned by critics as repetitious bombast, yet Botstein excavated a satirically edged twist that reminded me of Shostakovich. The concluding peace was so satisfying that I left with hardly a care in the world—some of the items rattling around in my head were healed and coalesced into solution, which is one of the healing acts of good music well-played. I’ve heard Ein Heldenleben a couple of times before at Sosnoff Theater but this performance by Botstein and TŌN was indelibly more memorable.” —Kevin T. McEneaney

Photo by David DeNee

THE ORCHESTRA NOW PERFORMS ITS FIRST 2018-19 SEASON CARNEGIE HALL CONCERT ON FRIDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2018

Leon Botstein Leads Orchestra in Russian Evolution: From Rimsky-Korsakov to Glière

New York, New York, November 26, 2018 — The Orchestra Now (TŌN) begins its fourth season at Carnegie Hall with a concert titled Russian Evolution: From Rimsky-Korsakov to Glière on Friday, December 14 at 7:30 pm.  The program focuses on the drama of Russian music and will also be performed at The Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College on Wednesday, December 12 at 7:00 pm.

Rimsky-Korsakov wrote much of his first symphony while serving in the Russian navy, and actually appeared onstage in uniform at the work’s 1865 premiere. Many Russian folk and oriental melodies can be heard in the piece, and nationalists dubbed it the “First Russian Symphony.” Reinhold Glière’s expansive Symphony No. 3, Ilya Muromets, is based on the life of one of Russia’s most famous mythical heroes. Highly respected for his values, he is the only such character to have been canonized by Russia’s Orthodox Church. Glière was a true believer in the pre-revolutionary national Russian school and hence, his embrace of traditional forms made him a favorite of Soviet authorities.

With this concert, Leon Botstein highlights the search for a true, nationalist style in Russian symphonic music, one with an aesthetic that incorporated folk or oriental themes or that was based on legends and folk heroes. The works performed at the evening’s concert by these two composers illustrate how Russian music evolved along those lines from the time of Rimsky’s first symphony (1865) to the time of Glière’s third (1911).

Russian Evolution: From Rimsky-Korsakov to Glière
Carnegie Hall Series, Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
Friday December 14, 2018 at 7:30 pm
Leon Botstein, conductor
Rimsky-Korsakov: Symphony No. 1
Reinhold Glière: Symphony No. 3, Ilya Muromets

TŌN will next appear at Carnegie Hall with Botstein conducting the U.S. premieres of Joachim Raff’s Psalm 130: De Profundis and Lera Auerbach’s De Profundis (Violin Concerto No. 3) with internationally acclaimed violinist Vadim Repin on May 2, 2019.  For details of upcoming 2018-19 season concerts, please click here.

Tickets start at $25, and may be purchased online at carnegiehall.org, by calling CarnegieCharge at 212.247.7800, or in person at the Carnegie Hall box office at 57th Street and Seventh Avenue.

The Orchestra Now
The Orchestra Now (TŌN) is a group of more than 60 vibrant young musicians from 14 different countries around the globe: the United States, Bulgaria, China, France, Hungary, Malaysia, Mongolia, Peru, Poland, Spain, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, Ukraine, and Venezuela. All share a mission to make orchestral music relevant to 21st-century audiences. Hand-picked from hundreds of applicants from the world’s leading conservatories—including The Juilliard School, Shanghai Conservatory of Music, Royal Conservatory of Brussels, and the Curtis Institute of Music—the members of TŌN are not only rousing audiences with their critically acclaimed performances, but also enlightening curious minds by presenting on-stage introductions and demonstrations at concerts, offering program notes written from the musicians’ perspective, and connecting with patrons through one-on-one discussions during intermissions. To date, members of TŌN have earned positions with orchestras across the United States and in Europe. Some play regularly with the New York Philharmonic, Philadelphia Orchestra, and the Baltimore Symphony.

Conductor, educator, and music historian Leon Botstein founded TŌN in 2015 as a master’s degree program at Bard College, where he also serves as president. The Orchestra is in residence at Bard’s Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts, offering multiple concerts there each season as well as participating in the annual Bard Music Festival. The Orchestra also performs numerous concert series at major venues in New York, including Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, and The Metropolitan Museum of Art, as well as a schedule of free performances across New York City boroughs. TŌN has collaborated with many distinguished conductors, including Fabio Luisi, Neeme Järvi, Gerard Schwarz, and JoAnn Falletta.

For upcoming activities and more detailed information about the musicians, visit theorchestranow.org.

Leon Botstein
Leon Botstein brings a renowned career as both a conductor and educator to his role as music director of The Orchestra Now. He has been music director of the American Symphony Orchestra since 1992, artistic co-director of Bard SummerScape and the Bard Music Festival since their creation, and president of Bard College since 1975. He was the music director of the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra from 2003–2011 and is now conductor laureate. This year he has assumed artistic directorship of Campus Grafenegg and Grafenegg Academy in Austria. Mr. Botstein is also a frequent guest conductor with orchestras around the globe, has made numerous recordings, and is a prolific author and music historian. He is the editor of the prestigious The Musical Quarterly and has received many honors for his contributions to music. More info online at LeonBotstein.com.

Press Contacts:
Pascal Nadon
Pascal Nadon Communications
Phone: 646.234.7088
Email: pascal@pascalnadon.com

Mark Primoff
Associate Vice President of Communications
Bard College
Phone: 845.758.7412
Email: primoff@bard.edu

Cadenza: Tan Dun Brings Nature’s Secrets to The Orchestra Now

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“The Orchestra Now gives hope. Founded in 2015 by Leon Botstein, TŌN is comprised of Master’s Degree students at Bard College, and can be found performing all over the city, including at Lincoln Center, Carnegie Hall, and Metropolitan Museum of Art — sometimes for free. Like the student orchestra at Tanglewood, and Miami’s New World Symphony, they’re capable of just about anything, and more than their professional counterparts, they really exude a personal love of music. And they rise to the occasion of encountering international stars like Tan Dun.

TŌN’s winds play with a dark, mellow timbre, rounded intonation, and a keen blend. The strings have a honey-like sheen and the violin section displays more rhythmic vitality than many orchestras. They sound terrific.

Underscoring the group’s educational underpinnings, it’s terrific how TŌN’s musicians are encouraged to contribute to the program notes, and to speak to the audience to introduce the repertoire. Their enthusiasm for the material, and their craft, is palpable. The concert concluded with an fervent reading of Ottorino Respighi’s early-twentieth-century four movement tone poem The Pines of Rome. As the first orchestral work to utilize an electronic recording (the third movement ends with a recording of the nightingale, as specified by the composer), it’s a fitting pairing with Dun’s Secret of Wind and Birds. The off-stage trumpet solo in the second movement was played with warm lyricism by Anita Tóth, and the third movement’s clarinet solo masterfully played by Viktor Tóth.” —Brian Taylor

The Epoch Times: Chopin and Delacroix: How Romanticism Grapples With Past and Present

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“Artist Eugène Delacroix, whose work is currently featured at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, was a leader in the French Romantic school. On Nov. 18, visitors are invited to explore his work in depth with the addition of Frédéric Chopin’s music and a lecture presented by conductor Leon Botstein and The Orchestra Now, in the museum’s ongoing “Sight and Sound” series.

‘The making of art was indispensably essential to their life. It was related to their politics, to their person, and they believed it was a powerful medium, whether painting or music, in the world they lived. Something we don’t believe today,’ Botstein said.” —Catherine Yang

Artwork: Eugène Delacroix, (French, 1798–1863). Collision of Arab Horsemen (detail), 1833/34. Oil on canvas. 31 11/16 × 39 9/16 in. (80.5 × 100.5 cm). Private collection