VIDEO FLASHBACK: Stravinsky’s Concerto for Piano and Wind Instruments

Composer Igor Stravinsky was born 139 years ago this month in Oranienbaum, Russia. Today we share our April performance of his Concerto for Piano and Wind Instruments, with conductor Leon Botstein and pianist Blair McMillen, which Stravinsky wrote in the early 1920s while living in France. In his notes on the piece, TŌN bass trombonist Jack E. Noble looks at why the composer chose the combination of piano and wind instruments for this concerto. “In an interview following the opening concerts Stravinsky expressed that ‘Strings and piano, a sound scraped and a sound struck, do not sound well together; piano and wind, sounds struck and blown, do.’ This is a noteworthy deviation from the norm which Stravinsky uses to highlight certain characteristics of sound. In particular, the percussive articulation of the piano stands out against the sustain of the winds.” You can read Jack’s full concert notes on the concerto by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Grażyna Bacewicz’s Concerto for String Orchestra

Grażyna Bacewicz‘s Concerto for String Orchestra premiered in Warsaw 71 years ago this week. We performed the piece with conductor Zachary Schwartzman in a physically-distanced, livestreamed concert from the Fisher Center at Bard on October 17, 2020. In his notes on the piece, TŌN violist Sean Flynn says the Concerto “is considered to be the composer’s finest work” and that it is “accessible to even a first-time listener while still holding many surprises and ear-catching moments.” Noting that the composer’s background as an accomplished violinist allowed her to write very technical string parts, he says “Bacewicz asks a lot of the players of this piece . . . mak[ing] for an intense but endlessly exciting playing experience, but I am sure that this intensity and excitement will be felt by listeners as well.” You can read his full concert notes on the work by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: A Chat with Tania León

In honor of her recent Pulitzer Prize win for the piece “Stride,” we are pleased to present this encore presentation of our April 8, 2021 Zoom discussion with composer, conductor, and educator Tania León. She chatted with composer and musicologist Sebastian Danila and musicians from The Orchestra Now (TŌN) about her career and her Pulitzer Prize-nominated work “Ácana,” which TŌN performed on April 10, 2021.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Grieg’s Holberg Suite (From Holberg’s Time)

Watch our February performance of the Holberg Suite (From Holberg’s Time) by Norwegian composer Edvard Grieg, who was born 178 years ago today. We performed the work with conductor James Bagwell in a physically-distanced livestreamed concert from the Fisher Center at Bard. In her notes on the piece, TŌN violinist Misty Drake says that the genesis of this work came when “Grieg was asked to compose festival music for the 200th anniversary of prominent Norwegian-Danish playwright Ludvig Holberg.” The music “engages in various meters and rhythms to blend Norwegian folksongs with classic Baroque dances. Definitely written with twirling and toe-tapping in mind! A year after the premiere, the Holberg Suite was rewritten for a string orchestra.” You can read Misty’s full concert notes on the work by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: R. Strauss’ Metamorphosen

We’re pleased to share our performance of Metamorphosen by Richard Strauss, who was born 157 years ago this week. Strauss wrote the piece in the final days of Nazi rule and sought to convey the meaning of how World War II had dramatically transformed humanity. It is constructed in a unique format for 23 solo strings—each of which has a part that is unique from all the others—that blend together to form an overwhelmingly rich texture. We performed the piece with conductor Leon Botstein for a livestream from the Fisher Center at Bard on November 1, 2020. You can read the concert notes, written by TŌN violinist Bram Margoles, by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Haydn’s Symphony No. 48, Maria Theresa

Enjoy TŌN’s performance of Haydn‘s Symphony No. 48, Maria Theresa, with conductor Leon Botstein, presented in a livestreamed, physically distanced concert from the Fisher Center at Bard on November 14, 2020. In his concert notes on the piece, TŌN cellist Pecos Singer says this symphony “hails from Haydn’s so-called Sturm und Drang (‘storm and stress’) period. The term appropriately describes the stormy quality just beneath the surface of the music. This can be heard best in the development of the first movement, certain episodes in the fourth movement, and the Trio section of the Minuet.” You can read his full notes on the piece by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Silvestre Revueltas: Cuauhnáhuac

This summer, The Orchestra Now is pleased to release videos from our livestreamed, physically distanced concerts this past season. First up is Cuauhnáhuac by Mexican composer Silvestre Revueltas, which premiered 88 years ago this week. We performed the work on November 1, 2020 with conductor Leon Botstein. In her concert notes on the piece, TŌN violist Katelyn Hoag says “Cuauhnáhuac is a fascinating fusion that uniquely blends pre-Colombian musical techniques with those of European modernists Claude Debussy and Igor Stravinsky to create a distinctly modern Mexican sound.” You can read her complete notes by clicking here.

TŌN IN: Sunset Serenade on Flute

As part of The Orchestra Now’s “Sunset Serenade” series, TŌN flutist Brendan Dooley performed Georg Philipp Telemann’s Fantasia No. 3 for a physically distanced audience at Old Dutch Church in Kingston, NY on September 24, 2020. Watch the full concert by clicking here.

TŌN IN: Sunset Serenade on French Horn

As part of The Orchestra Now’s “Sunset Serenade” series, TŌN horn player Ser Konvalin performed the world premiere of Nikea Randolph’s Seeking Every Resolution for a physically distanced audience at Opus 40 Sculpture Park in Saugerties, NY on September 23, 2020. Watch the full concert by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Bartók’s The Miraculous Mandarin Suite

TŌN is pleased to continue to share new videos with our audiences every Thursday. Today we’re bringing you Bartók‘s vivacious The Miraculous Mandarin Suite. We performed the piece in December 2019 with conductor Tan Dun at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Rose Theater. You can read the concert notes, written by former TŌN horn player William Loveless VI, by clicking here.