STAY TŌNED—AUDIO FLASHBACKS

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Jessie Montgomery’s Strum

This Tuesday’s Audio Flashback is the recent work Strum by Jessie Montgomery. Montgomery’s music has been recognized with the ASCAP Foundation’s Leonard Bernstein Award, and her current commissions include works for the New York Philharmonic and Carnegie Hall. The Washington Post has called her music “turbulent, wildly colorful and exploding with life.” The Orchestra Now performed Strum with conductor Andrés Rivas as part of last September’s Out of the Silence festival, presented with the Bard Music Festival and the Fisher Center at Bard. You can read the concert notes, written by Christopher H. Gibbs, Artistic Codirector of the Bard Music Festival, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: George Walker’s Lyric for Strings

For our first Audio Flashback of 2021 we offer the elegiac Lyric for Strings by George Walker. Walker was the first African-American winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Music. Fanfare magazine called him “one of the greatest composers of our time.” The Orchestra Now performed this piece with conductor James Bagwell as part of last September’s Out of the Silence festival, presented with the Bard Music Festival and the Fisher Center at Bard. You can read the concert notes, written by Christopher H. Gibbs, Artistic Codirector of the Bard Music Festival, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Joachim Raff’s Psalm 130: De Profundis

Our second Audio Flashback this Tuesday goes back to April 2019, when we performed the U.S. premiere of Joachim Raff‘s Psalm 130: De Profundis at the Fisher Center at Bard with conductor Leon Botstein; soprano Elizabeth De Trejo; and the Bard Festival Chorale, directed by James Bagwell. You can read the concert notes, written by TŌN horn player Emily Buehler, by clicking here.

0:00 Introduction: Andante (Moderately slow)
1:59 De Profundis: Andante con moto (Moderately slow, with motion)
8:24 Si iniquitates: Andantino (Moderate)
12:59 Quia apud te: Allegretto (Moderately fast)
17:18 A custodia matutina: Andante con moto (Moderately slow, with motion)
22:40 Et ipse redimet: Allegro (Fast) 

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Jennifer Higdon’s blue cathedral

Our first Audio Flashback this Tuesday is to our 2018 performance of Jennifer Higdon‘s ethereal and emotional blue cathedral. Higdon called the piece “a place of beginnings, endings, solitude, fellowship, contemplation, knowledge, and growth.” We performed the work with conductor James Bagwell at the Fisher Center at Bard on February 3, 2018. You can read notes from the composer by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 4

Beethoven‘s Piano Concerto No. 4 premiered on this day in 1808 in Vienna. Beethoven wrote the piece for himself, and its premiere was the last time he ever performed as a soloist with an orchestra. Pianist Anna Polonsky played the concerto with The Orchestra Now and conductor Leon Botstein at the Fisher Center at Bard this past February. You can read the concert notes, written by TŌN horn player Steven Harmon, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Beethoven’s Symphony No. 3, Eroica

Ludwig van Beethoven, one of the greatest classical composers of all time, was born 250 years ago this week. We honor him by sharing our February performance of his Symphony No. 3, Eroica. This innovative work marked a turning point not only in Beethoven’s career, but in music history altogether. We performed it with conductor Leon Botstein at the Fisher Center at Bard in a concert celebrating Beethoven. You can read the concert notes, written by TŌN flutist Leanna Ginsburg, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Stravinsky’s Symphony of Psalms

This Tuesday’s Audio Flashback is Igor Stravinsky’s Symphony of Psalms, which premiered 90 years ago this week. Stravinsky uses unusual instrumentation in this piece to create dark resonance and complexity. It all leads to an incredibly thought-provoking musical experience. Our 2018 performance at the Fisher Center at Bard, with the Bard College Chamber Singers and Bard Festival Chorale under the direction of James Bagwell, was led by conductor Leon Botstein. You can read the concert notes by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Elgar’s Symphony No. 1

This week’s audio flashback is our 2018 performance of Edward Elgar’s Symphony No. 1, performed with conductor Leon Botstein at the Fisher Center at Bard. Hans Richter, who conducted the premiere 112 years ago this Thursday, called it “the greatest symphony of modern times.” The audience at the premiere was so enthusiastic that Elgar was called to the stage to take a bow five times, and the symphony was performed around the world over 80 times in the following year. You can read the concert notes by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Penderecki’s Double Concerto

Our second Audio Flashback today is the 2012 Double Concerto of Polish composer Krzysztof Penderecki, who was born 87 years ago yesterday and passed away this past March. We performed the work in December 2017 with conductor JoAnn Falletta and two of her colleagues from the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra: violist Dennis Kim and cellist Roman Mekinulov. You can read the concert notes by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Stravinsky’s Divertimento, The Fairy’s Kiss Suite

Our first Audio Flashback this Tuesday is the suite from Stravinsky‘s ballet The Fairy’s Kiss, which we performed last November at the Fisher Center at Bard with conductor Leon Botstein. The ballet, which is an adaptation of the Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale The Ice Maiden and was Stravinsky’s homage to Tchaikovsky, premiered at the Paris Opera 92 years ago this Friday. You can read the concert notes, written by TŌN cellist Sarah Schoeffler, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: R. Strauss’ Four Songs, Op. 27

Our second Audio Flashback this Tuesday is the Op. 27 of Richard Strauss, Four Songs. Strauss originally wrote these songs for his wife, the soprano Pauline de Ahna, and gave them to her as a gift on their wedding day. We performed the work with soprano Paulina Swierczek and conductor Leon Botstein at the Fisher Center at Bard in September 2019. Read the concert notes, written by TŌN violinist Gaia Mariani Ramsdell, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Weber’s Clarinet Concerto No. 1

Today’s first Audio Flashback is our 2018 performance of Carl Maria von Weber‘s Clarinet Concerto No. 1 with soloist Elias Rodriguez TŌN ’18, winner of the orchestra’s 2017 Concerto Competition. Rodriguez calls this piece “a passionate journey with a protagonist who is at first sorrowful and suffering; then the epitome of innocence and beauty; and finally the joker, playful and exciting.” The work’s composer was born in Eutin, Oldenburg, Germany 234 years ago this Wednesday. We performed the concerto with conductor Leon Botstein at the Fisher Center at Bard on February 17, 2018. You can read Rodriguez’s concert notes by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Eugene Goossens’ Jubilee Variations

As we head in to Veterans’ Day in the United States, we offer a unique composition with a distinctly American sound written by eleven American composers. In celebration of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra’s 50th Anniversary in 1945, conductor and composer Eugene Goossens wrote a theme and finale, and invited ten other composers—including Aaron Copland, William Schuman, Walter Piston, and Roy Harris—to write variations. TŌN gave the NY premiere of this rarely-performed work at the Fisher Center at Bard two years ago this week under the baton of Gerard Schwarz. You can read brief concert notes by clicking here.

Theme: Goossens 0:00
Variation 1: Paul Creston 00:42
Variation 2: Aaron Copland 1:49
Variation 3: Deems Taylor 3:11
Variation 4: Howard Hanson 5:42
Variation 5: William Schuman 7:41
Variation 6: Walter Piston 9:37
Variation 7: Roy Harris 11:20
Variation 8: Anis Fuleihan 14:00
Variation 9: Bernard Rogers 16:03
Variation 10: Ernest Bloch 18:16
Finale: Goossens 20:22

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Copland’s Lincoln Portrait

This Election Day we offer our 2018 performance of Aaron Copland‘s Lincoln Portrait, with narrator Mx Justin Vivian Bond and conductor Leon Botstein. Composed in his distinct Americana style, and using themes from “On Springfield Mountain” and “Camptown Races,” Copland put together text in which he quotes different documents and speeches by Abraham Lincoln, including the Lincoln-Douglas debates and the Gettysburg Address. May this music help serve as a reminder of what makes this democracy so great.

You can read the concert notes, written by former TŌN flutist Matthew Ross, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Dohnányi’s Symphony No. 2

Our second Audio Flashback today is the Second Symphony of Hungarian composer Ernő Dohnányi. Written in the midst of the Second World War, this work alternates between a defeated man’s longing for death, and the desire to live, even through strife. Leon Botstein conducted TŌN’s performance of this symphony in the spring of 2017 at the Fisher Center at Bard. Read the concert notes, written by former TŌN clarinetist Elias Rodriguez, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Mussorgsky’s Night on Bald Mountain

Just in time for Halloween, we offer Mussorgsky’s frantic and fantastical Night on Bald Mountain, which premiered on this day in 1886. Known for its use in movies like Fantasia and The Wizard of Oz, and more recently in Halloween commercials for Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups, this musical poem represents a witches’ sabbath that boils and bubbles until the morning church bells scare away the spirits of darkness.

TŌN performed this piece in the fall of 2017 at the Fisher Center at Bard under the baton of Leon Botstein. You can read brief program notes, written by former TŌN violist Omar Shelly, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Egon Wellesz’s Prospero’s Incantations

Today we’re offering two Audio Flashbacks of works that were inspired by the plays of Shakespeare. Austrian composer Egon Wellesz was born 135 years ago this Wednesday. His 1936 Prospero’s Incantations sets five important characters and moments from Shakespeare’s The Tempest into individual movements. Though it was written 84 years ago, we performed the U.S. premiere of the piece just one year ago with Austrian conductor Hans Graf at the Fisher Center at Bard. You can read the concert notes, written by TŌN violist Leonardo Vásquez Chacón, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Joseph Joachim’s Hamlet Overture

Today we’re offering two Audio Flashbacks of works that were inspired by the plays of Shakespeare. Joseph Joachim—who was one of the leading violinists of his day, a favorite of Brahms—composed his Hamlet Overture at age 21, and it premiered 167 years ago this month. Listen for Hamlet’s inner turmoil, indecisive and mysterious, reflected in the music. We performed this piece two years ago under the baton of Leon Botstein at the Fisher Center at Bard. You can read the concert notes, written by former TŌN horn player Ethan Brozka, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Verdi’s Requiem

Italian composer Giuseppe Verdi was born 207 years ago this month. We performed his profound Requiem last year with soprano Margaret Tigue, mezzo-soprano Chloë Schaaf, tenor Cooper Nolan, bass Wei Wu, the Bard College Chamber Singers, the Bard Festival Chorale, and members of the Bard College Conservatory Orchestra. You can now listen to the audio recording of that performance, conducted by Leon Botstein, and read the concert notes, written by TŌN clarinetist Ye Hu, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Stravinsky’s Funeral Song

Our second Audio Flashback today is our April 2018 performance of Igor Stravinsky‘s long-lost Funeral Song. This tender lament was written by a young Stravinsky in tribute to the passing of his teacher, Rimsky-Korsakov. The parts were thought to have been destroyed in a fire, and were discovered just five years ago. You can read the concert notes by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Stravinsky’s Requiem Canticles

Igor Stravinsky‘s Requiem Canticles premiered 54 years ago this Thursday. We performed the piece two years ago at the Fisher Center at Bard with conductor Leon Botstein, mezzo-soprano Katherine Pracht, baritone Jonathan Beyer, the Bard College Chamber Singers, and the Bard Festival Chorale. One of the TŌN musicians said, “In typical Stravinsky fashion, this piece is totally out there. It’s made up of dark, short vignettes with a sharp, crisp quality.” You can read the concert notes by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Bartók’s The Miraculous Mandarin Suite

Our second Audio Flashback this week comes from our 2017 performance of Béla Bartók‘s The Miraculous Mandarin Suite at the Fisher Center at Bard with conductor Leon Botstein. Debuting as a pantomime ballet in 1926, this risqué story caused such a urproar that it was suspended from production after the first performance! The concert suite has proven to be much more popular, and was performed by TŌN again last December with conductor Tan Dun. You can read the concert notes from our original performance, written by former TŌN oboist Zachary Boeding, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Beethoven’s The Consecration of the House Overture

Beethoven‘s The Consecration of the House Overture premiered 198 years ago this Saturday, at the opening of the new Theater in der Josephstadt in Vienna. The premiere went so well that Beethoven used this overture to open another concert, when he premiered his ninth symphony. Listen back to our performance of this overture this past February, under the baton of Leon Botstein at the Fisher Center at Bard. You can read the concert notes, written by former TŌN violinist Tianpei Ai, by clicking here

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 10

Composer Dmitri Shostakovich was born 114 years ago this Friday. Today we’re revisiting our 2019 performance of his Tenth Symphony, under the baton of Leon Botstein. This piece spans a wide range of emotions, from the brooding, searching quality of the opening of the first movement, to the drive of the second movement, and the ominous clock-ticking of the third movement. Read the concert notes, written by TŌN cellist Lucas Button, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Galina Ustvolskaya’s Symphonic Poem No. 1

Our second Audio Flashback today is Galina Ustvolskaya‘s Symphonic Poem No. 1, which we performed one year ago at the Fisher Center at Bard under the baton of Leon Bostein. Ustvolskaya learned composition from Shostakovich, and dedicated this piece to the workers who tilled the land of Kazakhstan. You can read the concert notes, written by former TŌN bassoonist Matthew Gregoire, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Frank Martin’s Six Monologues from “Jedermann”

Swiss composer Frank Martin was born 130 years ago today. We performed his Six Monologues from Jedermann three years ago with baritone Nathaniel Sullivan and conductor Leon Botstein at the Fisher Center at Bard. Click below to listen to the recording, and read the concert notes, written by former TŌN violist Scot Moore, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 3

This Tuesday we revisit our September 2017 performance of Tchaikovsky‘s Symphony No. 3, performed at the Fisher Center at Bard under the baton of Leon Botstein. This symphony is the least-performed of the several that Tchaikovsky wrote. It is occasionally referred to as the “Polish Symphony” due to the Polish dance influences in the rhythms of the final movement, marked as Tempo di polacca. However, musicologists agree that this is a misleading nickname; the symphony is most definitely Russian. 

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Bruckner’s Symphony No. 4, Romantic

Composer Anton Bruckner was born 196 years ago this Friday, and to celebrate we’re releasing our performance of his 4th Symphony, the Romantic. Bruckner is known for his amazing writing for brass instruments, and this symphony has plenty of that “heavy metal” while also encompassing a wide range of emotional, expressive content. This performance was led by maestro Gerard Schwarz at the Fisher Center at Bard in November 2017. You can read the concert notes, written by former TŌN horn player Ethan Brozka, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Lili Boulanger’s Psalm 130: Du fond de l’abîme (De Profundis)

Our second audio flashback today from our April 2019 concert De Profundis is Lili Boulanger‘s heart-wrenchingly beautiful setting of Psalm 130, Du fond de l’abîme. The composer, who was born 127 years ago this past Friday, wrote this piece while at the peak of a terrible pulmonary illness that would soon cut her life short at age 24. The Orchestra Now performed this work with conductor Leon Botstein, soprano Elizabeth de Trejo, tenor Sean Fallen, and the Bard Festival Chorale, who are under the direction of James Bagwell. You can read the concert notes, written by TŌN clarinetist Rodrigo Orviz Pevida, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Virgil Thomson’s De Profundis

This Tuesday we offer two audio flashbacks from our April 2019 concert De Profundis. The first is Virgil Thomson‘s choral setting of Psalm 130, performed a cappella by the Bard Festival Chorale, conducted by James Bagwell. The text is below the video, and you can read the concert notes, written by TŌN trumpet player Guillermo García Cuesta, by clicking here.

Out of the deep have I called unto Thee, O Lord.
Lord, hear my voice:
O, let Thine ear consider well
the voice of my complaint.

If Thou, Lord, wilt be extreme
to mark what is done amiss,
O, Lord who may abide it?
For there is mercy with Thee,
therefore, shalt Thou be feared.

I look for the Lord,
my soul doth wait for Him.
In His word is my trust.
My soul fleeth after the Lord
before the morning watch,
I say before the morning watch.

O, Israel, trust in the Lord,
for with Him there is mercy,
And with Him is plenteous redemption.
And He shall redeem Israel from all his sins.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Buried Alive

For the next week you can stream a sneak peek of our new album BURIED ALIVE, available Friday, August 21 on Bridge Records. (Pre-order your copy now at https://bit.ly/3aHrgxd.) Recorded live at the Fisher Center at Bard this past November, the album features The Orchestra Now with conductor Leon Botstein performing three works written during the years 1926-1928: Othmar Schoeck‘s stunning 45-minute song cycle Lebendig begraben (Buried Alive), with baritone Michael NagyArthur Honegger‘s wildly colorful Rugby, and Dimitri Mitropoulos‘ rarely heard Concerto Grosso.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Tchaikovsky’s Francesca da Rimini

Our Audio Flashback this Tuesday is Tchaikovsky’s symphonic fantasia on Dante’s Inferno. In Francesca da Rimini we hear the title character and her lover descend into the circles of Hell, tossed about violently in a whirling storm of souls. Tchaikovsky was initially interested in creating an opera around this story, but the orchestral work he composed instead was an instant success. This performance was recorded at the Fisher Center at Bard in February 2019 under the baton of Leon Botstein. You can read the concert notes, written by TŌN cellist Sarah Schoeffler, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9

Oh, the joy! Given everything that’s going on in the world right now, we hope you’ll find it soothing to take an hour to luxuriate in one of the greatest symphonies of all time, Beethoven‘s Ninth. This performance was recorded in October 2017 at the Fisher Center at Bard, and features conductor Leon Botstein, soprano Chloé Olivia Moore, mezzo-soprano Teresa Buchholz, tenor John Pickle, bass-baritone Alfred Walker, the Bard College Chamber Singers, and the Bard Festival Chorale.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Schumann’s Symphony No. 2

Our Audio Flashback this Tuesday is our 2018 performance of Schumann‘s Symphony No. 2, under the baton of James Bagwell. Schumann was suffering from both physical and mental illness when he was writing this symphony, which he thought was noticeable in the music. “Only in the final movement did I begin to feel my old self again,” he wrote.  And indeed the final movement is a triumph, as the optimistic melody and resolution combat the moody and rebellious nature of the first movement. Read the concert notes by clicking here.

UPSTREAMING: Berlioz’s Roméo et Juliette

This week’s edition of Fisher Center at Bard’s UPSTREAMING includes our 2017 performance of Hector Berlioz‘s dramatic symphony Roméo et Juliette. Listen online at bit.ly/3hq6bJS.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Schubert’s Symphony No. 9, The Great

This Tuesday’s Audio Flashback is our performance of Schubert‘s Great 9th Symphony with conductor Hans Graf at the Fisher Center at Bard this past fall. Schubert’s 9th wasn’t heard until 11 years after his death! It was discovered at his brother’s house by Robert Schumann, and the premiere was conducted by Felix Mendelssohn. You can read the concert notes, written by TŌN horn player Emily Buehler, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Gershwin’s “An American in Paris”

To celebrate Bastille Day, today we’re listening back to our performance of George Gershwin‘s An American in Paris, recorded with conductor James Bagwell at the Fisher Center at Bard in February 2018. Gershwin began writing this piece during his trip to Paris, and he was so inspired by the Parisian taxi horns that he handpicked several horns to bring back to the U.S. for the New York City premiere at Carnegie Hall. Read the concert notes, written by former TŌN oboist Regina Brady, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Mahler’s Symphony No. 7

Gustav Mahler was born 160 years ago today, in 1860. We mark this 7/7 with our performance of Mahler’s 7th Symphony, conducted by Leon Botstein at the Fisher Center at Bard in February 2018. Mahler allegedly completed most of the symphony in just four weeks, during one of the happiest moments of his life and career. But by the time it premiered three years later, his life had turned upside-down. Read the concert notes by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Copland’s Symphony No. 3

As Pride Month comes to a close and Independence Day draws near, we pay tribute to an iconic gay composer who was celebrated for his “Americana” sound, Brooklyn’s own Aaron Copland. His third symphony is also known as the “Great American” and features the theme from his famous “Fanfare for the Common Man.” Read the concert notes, written by TŌN trumpet player Guillermo Garcia Cuesta, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Rimsky-Korsakov’s Symphony No. 1

This Tuesday’s audio flashback is the first symphony of Russian composer Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. Written in the composer’s late teens and early 20s, this symphony was an assignment from Rimsky’s composition teacher, and the second movement was written while he was at sea in the Russian navy. Some hailed the piece as “the first Russian symphony” due to its use of Russian folk melodies and avoidance of traditionally German compositional techniques. Read the concert notes, written by former TŌN harpist Emily Melendes, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: R. Strauss’ Ein Heldenleben (A Hero’s Life)

This week we’re looking at the theme of heroism in music. We invite you to stream our performance of R. StraussEin Heldenleben (“A Hero’s Life”), a work in six movements which the composer (tongue planted firmly in cheek) said features “lots of horns—which is always a measure of heroism.” Read the concert notes, written by former TŌN violinist Sophia Bernitz, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Wagner’s Siegfried’s Rhine Journey from Götterdämmerung

This week we’re looking at theme of heroism in music. We invite you to stream our performance of Wagner’s Siegfried’s Rhine Journey from the opera Götterdämmerung or “Twilight of the Gods”, depicting the ride that our hero and his lover take along the mighty Rhine River. Read the concert notes, written by TŌN violist Leonardo Vásquez Chacón, by clicking here.

Audio Flashback: William Grant Still’s Afro-American Symphony

This Tuesday’s audio flashback is our 2018 performance of the First Symphony of African American composer William Grant Still, which he dubbed the Afro-American Symphony. Written in 1930, this was the first symphony by an African American composer to be performed by a major orchestra in the United States. Still said that in writing the piece, he sought to portray “the sons of the soil, who still retain so many of the traits peculiar to their African forebears.” You can read more of Still’s notes on the symphony by clicking here.

The Orchestra Now remains committed to the fight against racial injustice, and stands in solidarity with black communities.

Audio Flashback: Ives’ Decoration Day

We’re releasing a live concert recording every Tuesday, and today we offer Charles IvesDecoration Day, based on the composer’s childhood memories of the Memorial Day celebrations in his hometown. Listen below and read the concert notes, written by former TŌN percussionist William Kaufman, by clicking here.

Audio Flashback: Lera Auerbach’s Violin Concerto No. 3, De Profundis

Starting today, we are thrilled to release a live concert recording from our archives every Tuesday! Today we offer the U.S. premiere of Lera Auerbach‘s Violin Concerto No. 3, De Profundis, performed with soloist Vadim Repin.

Join us on Facebook Thursday at 7 PM to watch the video of the concert featuring this performance, with a live chat with some TŌN musicians!

Audio Flashback: Glière’s Symphony No. 3, Ilya Muromets

Make some time this weekend to enjoy the epic Ilya Muromets symphony of composer Reinhold Glière, who studied with Rimsky-Korsakov and taught Prokofiev. Muromets is a famous folk hero of ancient Kievan Rus’, and this massive, multi-movement tone poem follows his gripping story. Read all about it in the concert notes, written by TŌN flutist Denis Savelyev, by clicking here.

This performance was recorded live at the Fisher Center at Bard on December 12, 2018, conducted by TŌN music director Leon Botstein.

UPSTREAMING: Rimsky-Korsakov’s Overture to “May Night” and “Dubinushka”

This week on UPSTREAMING from the Fisher Center at Bard, listen to our 2018 Bard Music Festival performances of Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov‘s Overture to May Night and Dubinushka. Listen online at fishercenter.bard.edu/upstreaming/.

UPSTREAMING: Korngold’s “A Passover Psalm”

This week on UPSTREAMING from the Fisher Center at Bard, listen to our Bard Music Festival performance of Erich Wolfgang Korngold‘s A Passover Psalm with soprano Marjorie Owens and the Bard Festival Chorale. Listen at fishercenter.bard.edu/upstreaming/.

Audio Flashback: Korngold’s Cello Concerto in C

We wish we could be performing for you live right now, but in the meantime please enjoy this recording of our performance of Erich Wolfgang Korngold‘s Cello Concerto in C, performed with soloist Nicholas Canellakis at the Fisher Center at Bard as part of the Bard Music Festival on August 9, 2019.