STAY TŌNED—AUDIO FLASHBACKS

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Tchaikovsky’s Francesca da Rimini

Our Audio Flashback this Tuesday is Tchaikovsky’s symphonic fantasia on Dante’s Inferno. In Francesca da Rimini we hear the title character and her lover descend into the circles of Hell, tossed about violently in a whirling storm of souls. Tchaikovsky was initially interested in creating an opera around this story, but the orchestral work he composed instead was an instant success. This performance was recorded at the Fisher Center at Bard in February 2019 under the baton of Leon Botstein. You can read the concert notes, written by TŌN cellist Sarah Schoeffler, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9

Oh, the joy! Given everything that’s going on in the world right now, we hope you’ll find it soothing to take an hour to luxuriate in one of the greatest symphonies of all time, Beethoven‘s Ninth. This performance was recorded in October 2017 at the Fisher Center at Bard, and features conductor Leon Botstein, soprano Chloé Olivia Moore, mezzo-soprano Teresa Buchholz, tenor John Pickle, bass-baritone Alfred Walker, the Bard College Chamber Singers, and the Bard Festival Chorale.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Schumann’s Symphony No. 2

Our Audio Flashback this Tuesday is our 2018 performance of Schumann‘s Symphony No. 2, under the baton of James Bagwell. Schumann was suffering from both physical and mental illness when he was writing this symphony, which he thought was noticeable in the music. “Only in the final movement did I begin to feel my old self again,” he wrote.  And indeed the final movement is a triumph, as the optimistic melody and resolution combat the moody and rebellious nature of the first movement. Read the concert notes by clicking here.

UPSTREAMING: Berlioz’s Roméo et Juliette

This week’s edition of Fisher Center at Bard’s UPSTREAMING includes our 2017 performance of Hector Berlioz‘s dramatic symphony Roméo et Juliette. Listen online at bit.ly/3hq6bJS.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Schubert’s Symphony No. 9, The Great

This Tuesday’s Audio Flashback is our performance of Schubert‘s Great 9th Symphony with conductor Hans Graf at the Fisher Center at Bard this past fall. Schubert’s 9th wasn’t heard until 11 years after his death! It was discovered at his brother’s house by Robert Schumann, and the premiere was conducted by Felix Mendelssohn. You can read the concert notes, written by TŌN horn player Emily Buehler, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Gershwin’s “An American in Paris”

To celebrate Bastille Day, today we’re listening back to our performance of George Gershwin‘s An American in Paris, recorded with conductor James Bagwell at the Fisher Center at Bard in February 2018. Gershwin began writing this piece during his trip to Paris, and he was so inspired by the Parisian taxi horns that he handpicked several horns to bring back to the U.S. for the New York City premiere at Carnegie Hall. Read the concert notes, written by former TŌN oboist Regina Brady, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Mahler’s Symphony No. 7

Gustav Mahler was born 160 years ago today, in 1860. We mark this 7/7 with our performance of Mahler’s 7th Symphony, conducted by Leon Botstein at the Fisher Center at Bard in February 2018. Mahler allegedly completed most of the symphony in just four weeks, during one of the happiest moments of his life and career. But by the time it premiered three years later, his life had turned upside-down. Read the concert notes by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Copland’s Symphony No. 3

As Pride Month comes to a close and Independence Day draws near, we pay tribute to an iconic gay composer who was celebrated for his “Americana” sound, Brooklyn’s own Aaron Copland. His third symphony is also known as the “Great American” and features the theme from his famous “Fanfare for the Common Man.” Read the concert notes, written by TŌN trumpet player Guillermo Garcia Cuesta, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Rimsky-Korsakov’s Symphony No. 1

This Tuesday’s audio flashback is the first symphony of Russian composer Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. Written in the composer’s late teens and early 20s, this symphony was an assignment from Rimsky’s composition teacher, and the second movement was written while he was at sea in the Russian navy. Some hailed the piece as “the first Russian symphony” due to its use of Russian folk melodies and avoidance of traditionally German compositional techniques. Read the concert notes, written by former TŌN harpist Emily Melendes, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: R. Strauss’ Ein Heldenleben (A Hero’s Life)

This week we’re looking at the theme of heroism in music. We invite you to stream our performance of R. StraussEin Heldenleben (“A Hero’s Life”), a work in six movements which the composer (tongue planted firmly in cheek) said features “lots of horns—which is always a measure of heroism.” Read the concert notes, written by former TŌN violinist Sophia Bernitz, by clicking here.

AUDIO FLASHBACK: Wagner’s Siegfried’s Rhine Journey from Götterdämmerung

This week we’re looking at theme of heroism in music. We invite you to stream our performance of Wagner’s Siegfried’s Rhine Journey from the opera Götterdämmerung or “Twilight of the Gods”, depicting the ride that our hero and his lover take along the mighty Rhine River. Read the concert notes, written by TŌN violist Leonardo Vásquez Chacón, by clicking here.

Audio Flashback: William Grant Still’s Afro-American Symphony

This Tuesday’s audio flashback is our 2018 performance of the First Symphony of African American composer William Grant Still, which he dubbed the Afro-American Symphony. Written in 1930, this was the first symphony by an African American composer to be performed by a major orchestra in the United States. Still said that in writing the piece, he sought to portray “the sons of the soil, who still retain so many of the traits peculiar to their African forebears.” You can read more of Still’s notes on the symphony by clicking here.

The Orchestra Now remains committed to the fight against racial injustice, and stands in solidarity with black communities.

Audio Flashback: Ives’ Decoration Day

We’re releasing a live concert recording every Tuesday, and today we offer Charles IvesDecoration Day, based on the composer’s childhood memories of the Memorial Day celebrations in his hometown. Listen below and read the concert notes, written by former TŌN percussionist William Kaufman, by clicking here.

Audio Flashback: Lera Auerbach’s Violin Concerto No. 3, De Profundis

Starting today, we are thrilled to release a live concert recording from our archives every Tuesday! Today we offer the U.S. premiere of Lera Auerbach‘s Violin Concerto No. 3, De Profundis, performed with soloist Vadim Repin.

Join us on Facebook Thursday at 7 PM to watch the video of the concert featuring this performance, with a live chat with some TŌN musicians!

Audio Flashback: Glière’s Symphony No. 3, Ilya Muromets

Make some time this weekend to enjoy the epic Ilya Muromets symphony of composer Reinhold Glière, who studied with Rimsky-Korsakov and taught Prokofiev. Muromets is a famous folk hero of ancient Kievan Rus’, and this massive, multi-movement tone poem follows his gripping story. Read all about it in the concert notes, written by TŌN flutist Denis Savelyev, by clicking here.

This performance was recorded live at the Fisher Center at Bard on December 12, 2018, conducted by TŌN music director Leon Botstein.

UPSTREAMING: Rimsky-Korsakov’s Overture to “May Night” and “Dubinushka”

This week on UPSTREAMING from the Fisher Center at Bard, listen to our 2018 Bard Music Festival performances of Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov‘s Overture to May Night and Dubinushka. Listen online at fishercenter.bard.edu/upstreaming/.

UPSTREAMING: Korngold’s “A Passover Psalm”

This week on UPSTREAMING from the Fisher Center at Bard, listen to our Bard Music Festival performance of Erich Wolfgang Korngold‘s A Passover Psalm with soprano Marjorie Owens and the Bard Festival Chorale. Listen at fishercenter.bard.edu/upstreaming/.

Audio Flashback: Korngold’s Cello Concerto in C

We wish we could be performing for you live right now, but in the meantime please enjoy this recording of our performance of Erich Wolfgang Korngold‘s Cello Concerto in C, performed with soloist Nicholas Canellakis at the Fisher Center at Bard as part of the Bard Music Festival on August 9, 2019.