STAY TŌNED—VIDEO FLASHBACKS

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Bruce Montgomery’s Concertino for String Orchestra

In March, conductor Andrés Rivas led The Orchestra Now in a livestreamed, physically distanced performance of Bruce Montgomery‘s Concertino for String Orchestra at the Fisher Center at Bard. Former TŌN violinist Shaina Pan wrote that “[The] English composer wrote mostly choral and film music, but was also known for his classic crime novels and short stories which he wrote under the pseudonym Edmund Crispin. . . . Concertino for String Orchestra is [his] sole instrumental work. After its first performance, a review described the piece as ‘a graceful, flowing, three-movement work, well written, economical in notes and notable for a lyrical lento espressivo of imaginative warmth.’” You can read Shaina’s full notes on the piece by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Frank Martin’s Petite symphonie concertante

In March, conductor Zachary Schwartzman led The Orchestra Now and soloists Renée Anne Louprette on  harpsichord, Frank Corliss on piano, and Taylor Ann Fleshman TŌN ’22 on harp in a performance of the Petite symphonie concertante by composer Frank Martin, who was born 131 years ago this week. Taylor Ann Fleshman writes that “The Petite symphonie concertante was composed in 1945 from a request made by Paul Sacher. Sacher did not micromanage how the piece was to be composed, but his one specific request was that plucked basso continuo instruments were to be employed along with standard string instruments. From here, Martin decided to use instruments that are still common today, which included harp, piano, and harpsichord. These three instruments are the soloists of the work while the remaining strings are split into two equally important groups.” You can read Taylor’s full concert notes on the piece by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Schoenberg’s Chamber Symphony No. 1

Last November, conductor Leon Botstein led The Orchestra Now in a livestreamed, physically distanced performance of the Chamber Symphony No. 1 of composer Arnold Schoenberg, who was born 147 years ago this week. TŌN clarinetist Matthew Griffith writes that “the Chamber Symphony No. 1 is a landmark at a distinctly pivotal moment in the history of classical music. . . . There are only 15 players on the stage, but the expressive range and intensity still sounds remarkably like a full orchestra.” You can read Matthew’s full concert notes on the work by clicking here.

TŌN IN: Shostakovich & Dawson

In this September 12, 2021 performance livestreamed from the Fisher Center at Bard, Leon Botstein conducts William L. Dawson’s distinctive and emotionally charged Negro Folk Symphony and Shostakovich’s enormous and patriotic 7th Symphony, Leningrad, written largely after the composer had fled the city following the German invasion during WWII.

Read the full concert program by clicking here.

Scroll down below the video for timings and concert notes.

1:00 Introductory remarks by TŌN violist Sean Flynn
6:57 William L. Dawson: Negro Folk Symphony
Read concert notes by TŌN bassist Tristen Jarvis by clicking here.

44:19 Introductory remarks by TŌN flutist Leanna Ginsburg
50:50 Dmitri Shostakovich: Symphony No. 7, Leningrad
Read concert notes by TŌN violist Celia Daggy by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Bernstein’s Serenade (after Plato’s Symposium)

In April, violinist Zongheng Zhang joined TŌN and conductor Leon Botstein for a performance of Leonard Bernstein‘s Serenade (after Plato’s Symposium) in a physically distanced concert that was livestreamed from the Fisher Center at Bard. TŌN timpanist Keith Hammer III writes that the piece is “based on Plato’s dialogue The Symposium. Plato’s work is a musical reflection of the impassioned, yet rancorous, speeches on the subject of love made by philosophers such as Aristophanes, Agathon, Phaedrus, and Socrates.” You can read Keith’s full concert notes on the Serenade by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Vaughan Williams’ Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis

In February, conductor James Bagwell and The Orchestra Now performed Ralph Vaughan Williams‘ Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis, which premiered 111 years ago this week. TŌN violinist Xinran Li writes that the piece “is full, serene, and spiritual” and that it “builds up with its complicated, flowing layers with interesting tones.” She notes that “the Fantasia is constructed for double string orchestra with string quartet, and is inspired by both a theme by 16th-century English composer Thomas Tallis, and John Bunyan’s Christian allegory The Pilgrim’s Progress, with which Vaughan Williams had a lifelong obsession.” You can read Xinran’s full concert notes on the work by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Jonny Greenwood’s Popcorn Superhet Receiver

In February, TŌN’s associate conductor James Bagwell led the orchestra in a performance of Popcorn Superhet Receiver by composer and Radiohead musician Jonny Greenwood. TŌN bassist Tristen Jarvis writes that the piece was “notably featured in the 2007 Oscar-nominated film There Will Be Blood. Deeply influenced by experimental 20th-century composers Olivier Messiaen, György Ligeti, Krzysztof Penderecki, and Arvo Pärt, Popcorn is dominated by dissonant, anxiety-provoking, microtonal clusters (evoking static from the shortwave radio catalog of an actual superheterodyne receiver), an infectious groove-based middle section, and familiar contemporary art-music atonality with occasional bursts of consonance for stability.” You can read Tristen’s full concert notes on the work by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Tania León’s Ácana

Conductor Leon Botstein led The Orchestra Now in a performance of Tania León‘s 2008 work Ácana in a livestreamed, physically distanced concert from the Fisher Center at Bard this past April. TŌN bassoonist Cheryl Fries writes that “León found inspiration for her chamber orchestra piece in Cuban Laureate Poet Nicolás Guillén’s poem dedicated to the Cuban tree. Sprawling to a height of 90 feet and 3 feet wide, the ácana tree is revered for its strength and wide-spreading roots. Guillén’s poem serves as an ode to the tree that is essential to Cuban life and society. The ácana’s role is described in this poem as being the pitchfork that helps to build homes, a staff to lead people safely home, and finally the table that will hold their coffins.” You can read Cheryl’s full notes on the piece, and Guillén’s poem, by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Martinů’s Double Concerto for Two String Orchestras, Piano, and Timpani

Last October The Orchestra Now, conducted by Zachary Schwartzman, performed the 1938 Double Concerto of Czech composer Bohuslav Martinů, who passed away 62 years ago this week. In her notes on the concerto, TŌN violinist Esther Goldy Roestan writes that “The political climate in Europe was very hostile around this time, especially because Hitler was still in power, and this severely impacted Czechoslovakia, where Martinu had a lot of connections. This was the year of Kristallnacht, the Czech Crisis, and the Munich Agreement. In this concerto, Martinů clearly expressed how he felt during this difficult time, and we can hear anxiety, depression, and restlessness throughout the piece.” You can read Esther’s complete notes on the piece by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Sarah Hennies’ Falling Together

The Orchestra Now had the privilege of performing the world premiere of Sarah Hennies‘ Falling Together with conductor James Bagwell in a livestreamed, physically distanced concert from the Fisher Center at Bard in February. The composer writes: “For many years I have been interested in labor as musical material. Labor is a necessity for human wellbeing—both economically and psychologically—despite being a source of weariness and stress. I often compose this ‘work music’ using a series of unusual repeating patterns that represent the effort and repetition of labor. Falling Together is inspired by the orchestral work of Iannis Xenakis, who composed individual parts for each member of the orchestra rather than grouping musicians by section that play in unison. The work’s utopian ‘society’ of all members working differently but together gradually exhausts itself.”

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Witold Lutosławski’s Funeral Music

Witold Lutosławski honored monumental 20th-century composer Bela Bartók with his piece Funeral Music, which TŌN performed in February with conductor Leon Botstein in a physically distanced concert livestreamed from the Fisher Center at Bard. TŌN violinist Adam Jeffreys writes that the work’s “prophetic tone has sparked debates about the true meaning of what the piece mourns. While it was commissioned to commemorate the tenth anniversary of Bartók’s death, one historian, Nicholas Reyald, argued that Lutosławski intended to honor Bartók by creating a work which mourned the sorrows of the 20th-century Polish experience, and which drew from his own personal tragedies and experiences.” You can read Adam’s complete concert notes on the music by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Rodion Shchedrin’s Carmen Suite (After Bizet’s Opera)

When Russian composer Rodion Shchedrin was asked to write the music for a Carmen ballet, he combined musical excerpts from three of Bizet‘s works to create his Carmen Suite. Zachary Schwartzman conducted TŌN’s performance of this work in a livestreamed, physically distanced concert from the Fisher Center at Bard this past March. TŌN percussionist Luis Herrera Albertazzi writes that “Shchedrin described the work as ‘not simply a slavish obeisance to the genius of Bizet, but rather an attempt at a creative meeting of two minds.’ The ballet was banned right after its first performance and called an insult to Bizet’s masterpiece, and for the sexualization of Carmen’s character.” You can read Luis’ full concert notes on the piece by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7

Enjoy our performance of Beethoven‘s Seventh Symphony, which we performed in May with conductor Leon Botstein in a livestreamed, physically distanced concert from the Fisher Center at Bard. TŌN oboist JJ Silvey writes that “Beethoven was able to suffuse the work with a palpable sense of revolutionary zeal. As a whole, the symphony is exuberant, grand, and unbridled in its dual capacities for jubilance and sincerity.” You can read JJ’s complete concert notes on the work by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Ulysses Kay’s Scherzi Musicali

In November 2020, conductor Andrés Rivas led TŌN in a performance of Scherzi Musicali by Ulysses Simpson Kay Jr., an African-American composer born in 1917 in Tucson, Arizona. TŌN horn player Ser Konvalin writes that “Scherzi musicali was written in 1968 to celebrate the 25th anniversary of The Chamber Music Society of Detroit. Kay’s compositional style is sometimes labeled as neoclassical, and his later works are sometimes labeled as atonal, crisp, and dissonant. The beauty of the chamber orchestra setting allows for each instrument to be heard clearly even while layering on top of one another.” You can read Ser’s full concert notes on the piece by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Hindemith’s Concert Music for Piano, Brass, and Harps

Today we’re sharing our performance of Paul Hindemith‘s Concert Music for Piano, Brass, and Harps. TŌN tuba player Jarrod Briley calls this piece “one of the hidden gems of Hindemith’s repertoire” and says, “of the many fantastic composers throughout classical music history, I can think of few who wrote as expressively and effectively for brass instruments as Paul Hindemith.” We performed this work with pianist Blair McMillen and conductor Leon Botstein in a physically distanced concert that was livestreamed from the Fisher Center at Bard in November 2020. You can read Jarrod’s full concert notes on the music by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Beethoven’s Triple Concerto

Violinist Adele Anthony, cellist Peter Wiley, and pianist Shai Wosner joined TŌN and conductor Leon Botstein for a performance of Beethoven‘s Triple Concerto in a livestreamed, physically distanced concert from the Fisher Center at Bard this past May. TŌN trumpet player Maggie Tsan-Jung Wei writes that the piece “is a competition or cooperation among three soloists. The three of them may play against each other, or support each other in different phrases. Beethoven was successful not only at putting these three solo instruments together in front of a whole orchestra, but also at keeping them balanced.” You can read Maggie’s entire concert notes on the concerto by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Edgard Varèse’s Hyperprism

Music Director Leon Botstein led the orchestra in a performance of Edgard Varèse‘s influential piece Hyperprism in a livestreamed, physically distanced concert from the Fisher Center at Bard in November 2020. In his notes on the work, TŌN horn player Steven Harmon says that “Varèse elevated rhythm to a new prominence, granted percussion instruments a role of unforeseen importance (and complexity), and developed a new sound world, dependent not on melody and harmony, but on timbre, texture, and dynamics.” You can read his full concert notes on the piece by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Vivaldi’s Concerto for Strings in G Minor, RV 156

This past March, conductor Zachary Schwartzman led the orchestra in the Concerto for Strings in G Minor, RV 156, composed by Antonio Vivaldi, who passed away 280 years ago this week. This piece is a full concerto with no featured soloists. The outer Allegro movements are tumultuous and fiery, with a strutting syncopation and rushing melodies. The double bass plays a walking line in the central Adagio movement, with the upper strings sustaining tones.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5

TŌN Music Director Leon Botstein led the orchestra in a performance of Beethoven‘s iconic Fifth Symphony this past May in a livestreamed, physically distanced concert from the Fisher Center at Bard. TŌN bassoonist Philip McNaughton notes that the symphony’s “four-note opening motif evokes an immediate reaction from not only the most avid classical music appreciator, but also from someone who has never stepped foot into a concert hall before. It has been played by world-class orchestras in almost every city around the world, and has even been heard in McDonald’s commercials. The piece premiered in Vienna in 1808 at a momentous all-Beethoven program that is said to have lasted four hours, at which the composer himself conducted and performed on the piano.” You can read Philip’s full concert notes on the symphony by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Victor Herbert’s Serenade for String Orchestra

This past March, we performed Victor Herbert‘s Serenade for String Orchestra with conductor Andrés Rivas in a livestreamed, physically distanced concert from the Fisher Center at Bard. The Romantic five-movement Serenade was well received at its debut at Steinway Hall in New York City in December of 1888, and was performed to great acclaim in concerts throughout the U.S. Of particular note is the passionate “Love Scene” movement, which was praised by The New York Times as “a particularly good piece of writing, being warm in theme and forceful in expression, and showing the results of careful study of Wagner’s wonderful treatment of strings.” You can read the full concert notes on this piece by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Handel’s Water Music Suite No. 1

Need a soundtrack for your time on the water with family and friends this summer? Enjoy our performance of Handel‘s Water Music Suite No. 1, which premiered 304 years ago this week on the River Thames in a concert for King George I. In his notes on the piece, TŌN oboist Shawn Hutchison tells us that the suite “Opens with a stylized and energetic French overture,” and  “features an assortment of Baroque dance forms (such as the minuet, bourrée, and hornpipe) transmuted from their original functions into lively concert music. These forms were a key element in the compositional language of the late Baroque, and were employed broadly and with great success by composers such as J.S. Bach, G.P. Telemann, and G. F. Handel.” You can read Shawn’s full concert notes on this work by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Schoenberg’s Verklärte Nacht (Transfigured Night)

Composer Arnold Schoenberg passed away 70 years ago today in Los Angeles at age 76. This past February we performed his work Verklärte Nacht (Transfigured Night) with conductor Leon Botstein in a livestreamed, physically distanced concert from the Fisher Center at Bard. In her notes on the piece, TŌN cellist Jordan Gunn tells the story of the Richard Dehmel poem on with the work is based. “The poem depicts an evening stroll in the moonlit forest, where a woman admits to her partner that she is carrying a child belonging to another. Desperate to find happiness through motherhood, she had been with a man she did not love. Now, being with a man she does truly love, she feels incredible guilt and anxiety. As they walk on, the man reveals to her that he cares for her deeply and will treat her child as his own, that their love will transfigure this child into one that is theirs. They embrace and continue their walk with a new transfigured perspective on life.” You can read Jordan’s full concert notes on Verklärte Nacht by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 3, “Scottish”

Today we are sharing our April 2021 performance of Felix Mendelssohn‘s Symphony No. 3, Scottish, conducted by Leon Botstein in a livestreamed, physically distanced concert from the Fisher Center at Bard. In her concert notes on the symphony, TŌN flutist Rebecca Tutunick describes how at age 20, “Mendelssohn started his Grand Tour with a three-week walking tour of Scotland, beginning in Edinburgh. . . . Over the next 13 years, Mendelssohn set aside and returned to his work on the Scottish Symphony several times, until eventually completing the symphony while in Berlin, in 1842.” You can read Rebecca’s full notes on the piece by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Pärt’s Cantus in Memory of Benjamin Britten

Arvo Pärt‘s Cantus in Memory of Benjamin Britten premiered 44 years ago this week in Estonia. We performed the work with conductor Zachary Schwartzman this past March in a livestreamed, physically distanced concert from the Fisher Center at Bard. In her notes on the piece, TŌN violinist Sabrina Parry quotes Pärt upon his learning of the English composer’s death: “Why should the date of Benjamin Britten’s death [December 4, 1976] touch such a chord in me? Evidently it was only in that moment that I matured enough to realize the magnitude of such a loss. Inexplicable feelings of duty, or even more than that, arose in me—I had just discovered Britten for myself. Not a very long time before his death, I recalled my impression of his music’s rare purity.” You can read Sabrina’s full concert notes by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Ingvar Lidholm’s Music for Strings

Today we’re sharing our March performance of Swedish composer Ingvar Lidholm‘s Music for Strings. We played the piece with conductor Andrés Rivas in a livestreamed, physically distanced concert from the Fisher Center at Bard. In her concert notes on this work, TŌN violinist Yinglin Zhou says the music sounds “tragic and intense. When I listened to the piece for the first time, the repetitive accented eighth-note patterns at the end of the last movement reminded me a lot of Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring.” You can read Yinglin’s full notes by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 3

Today we’re sharing our performance of the Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 by Johann Sebastian Bach, who passed away 271 years ago this week. We played this piece with conductor Leon Botstein in a livestreamed, physically distanced concert from the Fisher Center at Bard on February 7, 2021. In her notes on the concerto, TŌN violist Celia Daggy says that she enjoys “the blending of tradition with innovation” in classical music, and that Bach “is indeed a master at combining the two,” especially in this piece. “A concerto is typically a soloist ‘versus’ orchestra, but in Brandenburg 3 there is no individual soloist. Instead, each instrument is a soloist AND part of the orchestra. Brandenburg 3 features a first, second, and third part each of violins, violas, and cellos, accompanied by bass and harpsichord for a total of 11 unique parts.” You can read Celia’s full concert notes by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: M. Camargo Guarnieri’s Concerto for String Orchestra and Percussion

Revisit our performance of the Concerto for String Orchestra and Percussion by composer M. Camargo Guarnieri, who is sometimes known as “the Brazilian Mozart.” We performed the piece in October of 2020 with conductor Zachary Schwartzman in a physically distanced, livestreamed concert from the Fisher Center at Bard. In his notes on the concerto, former TŌN percussionist Charles Gillette observes that the work is “scored for strings, timpani, and two snare drums, . . . an unusual pairing of two sections in the orchestra that rarely play together.” He said that he was “struck by the way Guarnieri pairs rhythm with lyricism in this piece. He dedicated his 1942 piece Abertura Concertante to Aaron Copland, and I can definitely hear Copland’s influence in Concerto for Strings and Percussion.” You can read Charley’s full concert notes by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Stravinsky’s Concerto for Piano and Wind Instruments

Composer Igor Stravinsky was born 139 years ago this month in Oranienbaum, Russia. Today we share our April performance of his Concerto for Piano and Wind Instruments, with conductor Leon Botstein and pianist Blair McMillen, which Stravinsky wrote in the early 1920s while living in France. In his notes on the piece, TŌN bass trombonist Jack E. Noble looks at why the composer chose the combination of piano and wind instruments for this concerto. “In an interview following the opening concerts Stravinsky expressed that ‘Strings and piano, a sound scraped and a sound struck, do not sound well together; piano and wind, sounds struck and blown, do.’ This is a noteworthy deviation from the norm which Stravinsky uses to highlight certain characteristics of sound. In particular, the percussive articulation of the piano stands out against the sustain of the winds.” You can read Jack’s full concert notes on the concerto by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Grażyna Bacewicz’s Concerto for String Orchestra

Grażyna Bacewicz‘s Concerto for String Orchestra premiered in Warsaw 71 years ago this week. We performed the piece with conductor Zachary Schwartzman in a physically-distanced, livestreamed concert from the Fisher Center at Bard on October 17, 2020. In his notes on the piece, TŌN violist Sean Flynn says the Concerto “is considered to be the composer’s finest work” and that it is “accessible to even a first-time listener while still holding many surprises and ear-catching moments.” Noting that the composer’s background as an accomplished violinist allowed her to write very technical string parts, he says “Bacewicz asks a lot of the players of this piece . . . mak[ing] for an intense but endlessly exciting playing experience, but I am sure that this intensity and excitement will be felt by listeners as well.” You can read his full concert notes on the work by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: A Chat with Tania León

In honor of her recent Pulitzer Prize win for the piece “Stride,” we are pleased to present this encore presentation of our April 8, 2021 Zoom discussion with composer, conductor, and educator Tania León. She chatted with composer and musicologist Sebastian Danila and musicians from The Orchestra Now (TŌN) about her career and her Pulitzer Prize-nominated work “Ácana,” which TŌN performed on April 10, 2021.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Grieg’s Holberg Suite (From Holberg’s Time)

Watch our February performance of the Holberg Suite (From Holberg’s Time) by Norwegian composer Edvard Grieg, who was born 178 years ago today. We performed the work with conductor James Bagwell in a physically-distanced livestreamed concert from the Fisher Center at Bard. In her notes on the piece, TŌN violinist Misty Drake says that the genesis of this work came when “Grieg was asked to compose festival music for the 200th anniversary of prominent Norwegian-Danish playwright Ludvig Holberg.” The music “engages in various meters and rhythms to blend Norwegian folksongs with classic Baroque dances. Definitely written with twirling and toe-tapping in mind! A year after the premiere, the Holberg Suite was rewritten for a string orchestra.” You can read Misty’s full concert notes on the work by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: R. Strauss’ Metamorphosen

We’re pleased to share our performance of Metamorphosen by Richard Strauss, who was born 157 years ago this week. Strauss wrote the piece in the final days of Nazi rule and sought to convey the meaning of how World War II had dramatically transformed humanity. It is constructed in a unique format for 23 solo strings—each of which has a part that is unique from all the others—that blend together to form an overwhelmingly rich texture. We performed the piece with conductor Leon Botstein for a livestream from the Fisher Center at Bard on November 1, 2020. You can read the concert notes, written by TŌN violinist Bram Margoles, by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Haydn’s Symphony No. 48, Maria Theresa

Enjoy TŌN’s performance of Haydn‘s Symphony No. 48, Maria Theresa, with conductor Leon Botstein, presented in a livestreamed, physically distanced concert from the Fisher Center at Bard on November 14, 2020. In his concert notes on the piece, TŌN cellist Pecos Singer says this symphony “hails from Haydn’s so-called Sturm und Drang (‘storm and stress’) period. The term appropriately describes the stormy quality just beneath the surface of the music. This can be heard best in the development of the first movement, certain episodes in the fourth movement, and the Trio section of the Minuet.” You can read his full notes on the piece by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Silvestre Revueltas: Cuauhnáhuac

This summer, The Orchestra Now is pleased to release videos from our livestreamed, physically distanced concerts this past season. First up is Cuauhnáhuac by Mexican composer Silvestre Revueltas, which premiered 88 years ago this week. We performed the work on November 1, 2020 with conductor Leon Botstein. In her concert notes on the piece, TŌN violist Katelyn Hoag says “Cuauhnáhuac is a fascinating fusion that uniquely blends pre-Colombian musical techniques with those of European modernists Claude Debussy and Igor Stravinsky to create a distinctly modern Mexican sound.” You can read her complete notes by clicking here.

TŌN IN: Sunset Serenade on Flute

As part of The Orchestra Now’s “Sunset Serenade” series, TŌN flutist Brendan Dooley performed Georg Philipp Telemann’s Fantasia No. 3 for a physically distanced audience at Old Dutch Church in Kingston, NY on September 24, 2020. Watch the full concert by clicking here.

TŌN IN: Sunset Serenade on French Horn

As part of The Orchestra Now’s “Sunset Serenade” series, TŌN horn player Ser Konvalin performed the world premiere of Nikea Randolph’s Seeking Every Resolution for a physically distanced audience at Opus 40 Sculpture Park in Saugerties, NY on September 23, 2020. Watch the full concert by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Bartók’s The Miraculous Mandarin Suite

TŌN is pleased to continue to share new videos with our audiences every Thursday. Today we’re bringing you Bartók‘s vivacious The Miraculous Mandarin Suite. We performed the piece in December 2019 with conductor Tan Dun at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Rose Theater. You can read the concert notes, written by former TŌN horn player William Loveless VI, by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Stravinsky’s Fireworks

Before you watch the New Year’s Eve fireworks, enjoy Stravinsky‘s Fireworks! The Orchestra Now performed this 1908 work last December with conductor Tan Dun at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Rose Theater. You can read the concert notes, written by TŌN violist Lucas Goodman, by clicking here.

All of us at TŌN wish all of you a happy and prosperous 2021!

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Debussy’s Rhapsody for Clarinet

This week we’re revisiting our performance of Claude Debussy’s Rhapsody for Clarinet, with TŌN’s very own Viktor Tóth as the soloist. We performed this work with conductor Tan Dun one year ago this week at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Rose Theater. You can read the concert notes, written by TŌN clarinetist Ye Hu, by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Out of the Silence—Program Four

This Throwback Thursday, revisit the final program from our September series Out of the Silence, presented with the Bard Music Festival, the Bard College Conservatory of Music, and the Fisher Center at Bard. Led by TŌN’s music director, Leon Botstein, this concert features Duke Ellington‘s Solitude and Sophisticated Lady; Joseph Bologne, Chevalier de Saint-Georges‘ Symphonie concertante in G Major, with violinists Cyrus Beroukhim and Philip Payton; and Music for Strings, Percussion, and Celesta by Béla Bartók, who was the subject of the 1995 Bard Music Festival.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Sunset Serenade at Old Dutch Church

This Throwback Thursday, revisit our Sunset Serenade concert from late September, when woodwind musicians from The Orchestra Now performed short pieces outside of Old Dutch Church in Kingston, NY for a physically distanced audience. Enjoy music by Claude Debussy, Georg Philipp Telemann, and others, performed on flute, oboe, and clarinet.

View the video by clicking here.
View the concert information by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Out of the Silence—Program Three

This Throwback Thursday, revisit the third program from our recent series Out of the Silence, presented with the Bard Music Festival, the Bard College Conservatory of Music, and the Fisher Center at Bard. In this video, TŌN’s assistant conductor, Andrés Rivas, leads the Adagio trágico by Roque Cordero; resident conductor Zachary Schwartzman conducts Four Novelettes by Anglo-African late-Romantic composer Samuel Coleridge-Taylor; and music director Leon Botstein conducts the Serenade for Strings of Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, who was the subject of the 1998 Bard Music Festival.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Sunset Serenade at Opus 40

This Throwback Thursday, revisit our Sunset Serenade concert from September 23, when brass musicians from The Orchestra Now performed short pieces at Opus 40 sculpture park in Saugerties, NY for a physically distanced audience. Enjoy music by BachShostakovich, Dukas, and several others.

View the video by clicking here.
View the concert information by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Out of the Silence—Program Two

This Throwback Thursday, revisit the second program from our recent series Out of the Silence, presented with the Bard Music Festival, the Bard College Conservatory of Music, and the Fisher Center at Bard. In this video, TŌN’s assistant conductor, Andrés Rivas, leads Jessie Montgomery’s Strum; associate conductor James Bagwell conducts Alvin Singleton’s After Choice; resident conductor Zachary Schwartzman leads Adolphus Hailstork’s Sonata da Chiesa; and music director Leon Botstein conducts the Serenade for Strings by Antonín Dvořák, who was the subject of the 1993 Bard Music Festival.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Sunset Serenade at Old Dutch Church

This Throwback Thursday, revisit our Sunset Serenade concert from four weeks ago, when woodwind musicians from The Orchestra Now performed short pieces outside of Old Dutch Church in Kingston, NY for a physically distanced audience. Enjoy music by Benjamin Britten, César Vivanco Sanchez, and several others, performed on flute, oboe, clarinet, and bassoon.

View the video by clicking here.
View the concert information by clicking here.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Out of the Silence—Program One

This Throwback Thursday, revisit the opening program from our recent series Out of the Silence, presented with the Bard Music Festival, the Bard College Conservatory of Music, and the Fisher Center at Bard. In this video, TŌN’s associate conductor, James Bagwell, leads the elegiac Lyric for Strings by George Walker, the first African-American winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Music. Then Music Director Leon Botstein conducts the exuberant String Symphony No. 8 by Felix Mendelssohn, who was the subject of the Bard Music Festival’s second season in 1991.

VIDEO FLASHBACK: Rimsky-Korsakov’s Scheherazade

This Thursday’s video feature is a flashback to our December 2016 performance of Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov‘s Scheherazade with conductor JoAnn Falletta. Former TŌN violinist Holly Nelson introduces the piece at the top of the video, and you can read the concert notes, written by former TŌN violinist Grace Choi, by clicking here.

0:00 Introduction by Holly Nelson violin 
2:57 The Sea and Sinbad’s Ship 
12:56 The Legend of the Kalendar Prince 

25:19 The Young Prince and The Young Princess 
36:11 Festival at Baghdad—The Sea—The Shipwreck 

Video Flashback: Shostakovich, Michelangelo & The Artistic Conscience

In the hit series Sight & Sound at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Leon Botstein and The Orchestra Now explore the parallels between music and art. Now you can enjoy our 2018 performance of Shostakovich’s “Suite on Verses of Michelangelo” with baritone Tyler Duncan, which was live streamed on Facebook. Scroll down for more details, below the video.

Conductor and music historian Leon Botstein and The Orchestra Now (TŌN) explore Shostakovich’s “Suite on Verses of Michelangelo Buonarroti” and works from The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s exhibition “Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer.” Recorded live at The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium at The Metropolitan Museum of Art on February 11, 2018.
Tyler Duncan, baritone

1:29 Introduction
1:57 Remarks by Carmen C. Bambach, curator of the exhibition “Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer”
3:51 Discussion & Excerpts with Leon Botstein and The Orchestra Now
37:43 Review of artworks from the exhibition “Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer”
46:05 Performance of Shostakovich’s “Suite on Verses by Michelangelo Buonarroti”
47:43 Truth
52:03 Morning
54:46 Love
58:20 Separation
1:00:39 Anger
1:02:37 Dante
1:06:04 To the Exile
1:10:45 Creativity
1:13:24 Night
1:17:54 Death
1:22:10 Immortality
1:27:17 Q&A with the Audience

Dmitri Shostakovich
Born: 9/25/1906 in St. Petersburg
Died: 8/9/1975 at age 68 in Moscow

Written: 1974, at age 67

Premiered: 10/12/1975 at the Moscow Conservatory Bolshoi Hall in Moscow; USSR Radio and Television Orchestra; Maxim Shostakovich, conductor

Video Flashback: 2019 China Now Music Festival

Today Bard Music Connects and the Bard College Conservatory of Music are looking back at the 2019 China Now Festival, presented by the US-China Music Institute of the Bard College Conservatory. Watch TŌN’s performance at Stanford University below.

Video Flashback: Nielsen’s Aladdin Suite

This week for your listening pleasure, enjoy our 2016 performance of Carl Nielsen‘s Aladdin Suite, performed with conductor JoAnn Falletta at the Lehman Center for the Performing Arts at Lehman College in the Bronx on December 18, 2016.

Carl Nielsen Aladdin Suite
with remarks from TŌN violinist Lili Sarayrah
JoAnn Falletta conductor
>Concert notes by TŌN cellist Jinn Shin

Video Flashback: De Profundis: Out of the Depths

Watch our April 2019 concert De Profundis: Out of the Depths.

World-renowned violinist Vadim Repin joined TŌN for this musical exploration of Psalm 130, which reads “Out of the depths, Oh Lord, have I cried unto Thee.” Repin performed the U.S. premiere of Lera Auerbach’s Violin Concerto No. 3, De Profundis. Lili Boulanger’s rendering of the psalm, performed with soprano Elizabeth de Trejo, is dedicated to the memory of her father and was composed at the early age of 22, just one year before her death. Also on the program are an a cappella choral interpretation by Pulitzer Prize winner Virgil Thomson, and the U.S. premiere of Joachim Raff’s setting for soprano, eight-part choir, and orchestra, which he dedicated to his former colleague, Franz Liszt.

Scroll down for program details and the video of the concert.

0:36 Virgil Thomson De Profundis
Bard Festival Chorale
James Bagwell Director
>Concert notes by TŌN trumpet player Guillermo García Cuesta

4:39 Introductory remarks from TŌN bassoonist Adam Romey
12:56 Joachim Raff Psalm 130: De Profundis (U.S. Premiere)
Elizabeth de Trejo soprano
Bard Festival Chorale
Leon Botstein conductor
>Concert notes by TŌN horn player Emily Buehler

42:26 Introductory remarks from TŌN violinist Drew Youmans
48:55 Lera Auerbach De Profundis (Violin Concerto No. 3) (U.S. Premiere)
Vadim Repin violin
Leon Botstein conductor
>A poem by Lera Auerbach

1:25:20 Introductory remarks from TŌN trumpet player Anita Tóth
1:29:20 Lili Boulanger Psalm 130: Du fond de l’abîme (De Profundis)
Elizabeth de Trejo soprano
Leon Botstein conductor
>Concert notes by TŌN clarinetist Rodrigo Orviz Pevida